The BASEES Women’s Forum offer three prizes annually for scholarly work of high quality either produced by a woman or which furthers knowledge about gender and diversity relevant to the East European, Russian and Eurasian region.

Prizes are offered in the following categories:

a) A singly or jointly authored book OR singly or jointly authored edited collection.

b) A scholarly article or book chapter.

c) A postgraduate conference paper, to be given at the BASEES conference.

The authors of nominated works must at the time of nomination be members or associate members of the Association. 

For the 2019/20 cycle, the BASEES Women’s Forum prize scheme is accepting nominations for books and articles published in 2018. The deadline for nominations is 1 July 2019, and the winners will be announced early in 2020. For postgraduate conference papers, a copy of the paper must be submitted to the prize committee by 1 March 2020. The prizes (if awarded) will be presented at the annual dinner of the 2020 conference.

The current regulations are as follows:

1. The prizes are offered annually for scholarly works of high quality either produced by a woman or which furthers knowledge about gender and diversity relevant to the East European, Russian and Eurasian region, in the following categories:

a) A singly or jointly authored book (one hundred pounds).

b) A scholarly article or book chapter (fifty pounds).

c) A postgraduate conference paper, to be given at the BASEES conference (fifty pounds).

2. Works nominated for consideration must be of a scholarly character and must be in English. Books and articles must have been published - as defined by the date of imprint or, if a periodical, the cover date - within the 12 months of the calendar year preceding the annual closing date for nominations. For postgraduate conference papers, a copy of the paper must be submitted in advance of the conference.

3. The authors of nominated work must at the time of nomination be members or associate members of the British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies. It is the responsibility of the nominator to check the BASEES membership status of potential nominees and ensure that membership is in place prior to nomination. Nominations of non-members will not be considered.

4. Awards will be made by a jury whose membership will be approved by the Executive Committee of the BASEES Women’s Forum.

5. The jury may divide the Prize equally between not more than two nominated works in any year; or they may make no award in any year in which no work of sufficient merit presents itself.

6. Works may be nominated for consideration by the authors, or by publishers, librarians or other scholars.

7. Two copies of the nominated work(s) should also be sent to the BASEES Women’s Forum Prize Committee. The contact details are as follows: 

BASEES Women's Forum Prize Committee

c/o Dr Claire Shaw

Department of History, University of Warwick

Humanities Building, University Road

Coventry, CV4 7AL

8. The deadline for submission of nominations shall be 1 July each year in respect of publications whose imprint date is the previous calendar year, and 1 March (immediately preceding the conference) for postgraduate conference papers.  The prize is awarded (if a recommendation is made to do so) at the Association's annual conference in the spring of the calendar year following the deadline for submission of nominations.

9. Nominations should be made on the standard form for this purpose, which is available as a download from this page, and submitted to the Prize Committee at C.Shaw.2@warwick.ac.uk.

CURRENT AND PAST WINNERS

2017

Claire Shaw, Deaf in the USSR: Marginality, Community, and Soviet Identity, 1917-1991 (Cornell University Press, 2017) (Book Prize)

Sarah Marks, ‘The Romani Minority, Coercive Sterilizations, and Languages of Denial in the Czech Lands’, History Workshop Journal, 84, Autumn 2017, pp. 128-148 (Article Prize)

2016

Pauline Fairclough, Classics for the Masses: Shaping Soviet Musical Identity under Lenin and Stalin (Yale University Press, 2016) (joint Book Prize)

Sarah Badcock, A Prison without Walls? Eastern Siberian Exile in the Last Years of Tsarism (Oxford University Press, 2016) (joint Book Prize)

2017

THE BASEES WOMEN’S FORUM BOOK PRIZE 2017 (AWARDED 2019)

WINNER: Claire Shaw, Deaf in the USSR: Marginality, Community, and Soviet Identity, 1917-1991 (Cornell University Press, 2017)

From the beginning of the Soviet era, the social power of the deaf, their agency and autonomy, was tied to sovietness. This statement, however, oversimplifies a complex history, which Claire Shaw explicates in remarkable detail, drawing on both published and archival sources. Her book expands the scope of our understanding of behaviours and identity in Soviet history, while also providing glimpses into the pre-revolutionary and post-Soviet eras. How deaf identity has been marked by separateness v. inclusion, the status of sign language, the dignity of work, criminality, gender and many other issues will make this landmark study a classic read. 

Honourable mention: Barbara Havelkova, Gender Equality in Law: Uncovering the Legacies of Czech State Socialism (Bloomsbury, 2017) 

THE BASEES WOMEN’S FORUM article PRIZE 2017 (AWARDED 2019)

Winner: Sarah Marks, ‘The Romani Minority, Coercive Sterilizations, and Languages of Denial in the Czech Lands’, History Workshop Journal, 84, Autumn 2017, pp. 128-148.

The article possesses several strengths: firstly, it draws on multiple sources which include oral history as well as published and unpublished materials; secondly, it offers a highly sophisticated and rich discussion of the complexities of whistleblowing, lack of action, denial, silences, state-fostered uniformedness and coercion concerning sterilization practices of the Romani minority; thirdly, and most ambitiously, it approaches data through the framework of Czech phenomenology, which itself drew on the tradition of European philosophy.  The piece is very well-written, flows nicely and makes an important contribution to the study of politics and society in Soviet Czechoslovakia and in the Czech Republic, to gender studies and also to methodology.

Honourable mention: Matilda Mroz, ‘Film at Full Gallop: Aesthetics and the Equine in Poland’s Epic Cinema,’ in popular cinemas in east central EUROPE: film cultures and histories, ed. by Dorota Ostrowska,  Francesco Pitassio, and Zsuzsanna Varga (i.B. Tauris, 2017), pp. 173-183.

2016

THE BASEES WOMEN’S FORUM BOOK PRIZE 2016 (AWARDED 2018)

WINNERS: Pauline Fairclough, Classics for the Masses: Shaping Soviet Musical Identity under Lenin and Stalin (Yale University Press, 2016)

Sarah Badcock, A Prison without Walls? Eastern Siberian Exile in the Last Years of Tsarism (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Pauline Fairclough’s Classics for the Masses shows how, in the shaping of Soviet cultural identity from 1917 to 1953, music played an important role. Great works of art were integrated into the Soviet canon, but could also be used to criticise contemporary Soviet artists, to build a new narrative of Russian supremacy, while stamping out musical avant-gardism. Fairclough’s book provides fascinating detail on programming and performance based on archival research. She explains judiciously an era which, while it may not have ‘moulded’ the Soviet listener, did offer a form of entertainment not widely accessible before 1917. The canon was never wholly static, even in the years 1948-53, when it was most tightly controlled. Her book will be the definitive work on this subject.

While Soviet historiography emphasized the cultural benefits that political exiles brought to Siberia, Sarah Badcock’s A Prison Without Walls? gives voice as well to the regional authorities and local populations, who articulated the negative impacts of exile on their communities.  Exiles who lacked private means were forced to provide for themselves in unaccustomed conditions. There was a quota on those allowed into the towns, and little work elsewhere. Criminal exiles roamed free, for example in Yakut villages, further impoverishing and terrorising their local inhabitants. Badcock has consulted archives in the Sakha Republic and the Irkutsk Oblast. We hear new kinds of voices in this study, and find descriptions that prove further that state ambitions for forced labour and the misery of prisoners and their families did not begin with the Soviet state.