REEM Annual Conference 2017 Music and Revolution
Dec
15
9:30am 9:30am

REEM Annual Conference 2017 Music and Revolution

On the occasion of the centenary of the Russian revolution, the BASEES Study Group for Russian and Eastern European Music will hold its 2017 conference at Goldsmiths, University of London, on Friday 15th December. The theme of the conference is ‘Music and Revolution’, and our speakers explore a broad range of revolutionary moments in Russia and Central and Eastern Europe: from Decembrists to Bolshevists, from Springs to Singing Revolutions and the collapse of communism. The full programme may be found here.

Themes include:

-        Music at the time of and in response to revolution

-        Protest music and revolutionary song

-        Sounds and soundscapes of revolution

-        Musical change and continuity post-revolution

-        Politicisation of music

-        Emigration, exile and changing musical landscapes

The conference’s official language is English.

Accommodation suggestions:

Transport: The nearest stations to Goldsmiths are New Cross Gate and New Cross. These are served by the London Overground (the orange line on the tube map) and national rail services. You can plan journeys here

REEM has a modest amount of money available to assist speakers, especially postgraduates and those without access to other funds, with the costs of attending. If you would like to be considered for such funding, which is likely to cover only an element of your travel and/or accommodation, please indicate this in your proposal.

Convenors: Tamsin Alexander, Philip Bullock, Pauline Fairclough, Katerina Levidou, Ivana Medić, Danijela Špirić-Beard and Patrick Zuk.

Any enquiries should be sent to reemstudygroup@gmail.com

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XVI International Congress of Slavists, August 2018
Aug
22
to Aug 27

XVI International Congress of Slavists, August 2018

XVI International Congress of Slavists, August 2018

The XVI International Congress of Slavists is expected to take place in Belgrade, 22-27 August 2018.  The thematic areas to be included in the Congress are listed on the webpage of the International Committee of Slavists (http://www.fil.bg.ac.rs/lang/sr/centri-i-instituti/mks/osnovne-smernice-programa/).

Applications to organize or participate in panels (‘thematic blocks’) are invited by the deadline of 1 May 2016, for decision in the autumn of 2016 (http://www.fil.bg.ac.rs/lang/sr/centri-i-instituti/mks/tematski-blokovi/).  A thematic block should consist of 3-8 participants, of whom not more than 2 may be from the same country, and should include papers in at least 2 Slavonic languages, preferably 3.  The organizer of a thematic block must ensure that there is an introductory paper lasting not more than 20 minutes and that the other papers last not more than 15 minutes; discussants should speak not more than 5 minutes.  The organizer must arrange for the papers to be made available electronically in advance of the Congress and provide a link which can be placed on the Congress website.  A final version of the papers, taking account of discussion, may be published after the Congress.

When submitting an application for a thematic block, the organizer must send in a subject outline and abstracts of the papers (not longer than 1000 characters including spaces).  Applications and abstracts should be sent to mks@fil.bg.ac.rs, with ‘Thematic block’ in the subject heading, before 1 May 2016; please copy for information to the UK representative, Mary MacRobert (catherine.macrobert@lmh.ox.ac.uk).  The contact for enquiries is Professor Rajna Dragićević (rajnad@yahoo.com).

The deadline for applications to give individual papers in thematic sessions will be approximately 18 months in advance of the Congress, i.e. by the beginning of 2017.  Individual papers should either deal comparatively with more than one Slavonic language / literature / culture, or should have a theoretical dimension.  Prepublication with an ISBN/ISSN is required for individual papers, but this may be either in fully published printed or electronic form or in ‘green’ Open Access form via institutional research archives.

Individual papers are subject to the national quota (which does not include speakers in thematic blocks) and applications must therefore be forwarded via the national representative on the ICS, with an indication of the appropriate thematic section.  The quota of places for UK delegates at the Congress is 15, and the national representative is Mary MacRobert (Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA. Tel. 01865-274399. e-mail: catherine.macrobert@lmh.ox.ac.uk).  Please let her know if you plan to organize a thematic block or contribute a paper. 

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Between Exploitation and Empowerment: Participation of Women in the Second World War
Jun
17
10:00am10:00am

Between Exploitation and Empowerment: Participation of Women in the Second World War

One-day conference

17 June 2017

University of East Anglia

‘The “female” war has its own colours, smells, lighting and sensory space. Its own words. There are no heroes and extraordinary deeds, there are just people, busy with their inhuman human affairs’. (Svetlana Aleksievich, 1988)

 The Second World War saw women become participants in armed combat, perpetrators, victims and survivors of violence, bystanders and, in some cases, all of these at once. War histories, however, tend to be written from the masculine point of view and thus often exclude women’s direct knowledge of political violence or include it in an instrumentalised way that reveals little about women’s experiences. Lack of access to such knowledge results in incomplete histories of events, historical periods, and populations. Close investigation of female narratives of war, on the other hand, can provide a more inclusive historiography: the focus on women’s experiences and their incorporation into the history of all aspects of war will improve our understanding of war as such, and reveal that gender roles constructed in the context of warfare reflect wider gender dynamics in societies involved in a war. Some aspects of women’s active participation in political violence in general and in the Second World War in particular have been perceived as empowering. Women clearly demonstrated their ability to perform the same roles as the men. On the other hand, it is undeniable that women who took an active part in warfare did so in a masculinist setting, and the acceptance of women in traditionally masculine roles often lasted for the duration of the conflict only. The roles women played and the contexts in which they operated differed from country to country, but there were also many similarities in their experiences. This conference aims to explore women’s experiences of the Second World War by examining where they fit in the grey zones between empowerment and exploitation. 

 

Applications are sought from scholars (including post-graduates and early career), focusing on the following themes relating to female experiences of World War II, although this list is not exhaustive and other relevant themes will be considered (comparative papers are particularly encouraged):

 

• women in regular military formations;

• women in guerrilla warfare;

• political violence and civilian women;

• female forced labourers;

• sexual violence in the context of political violence;

• gender perspective of collaboration;

• female prisoners (including prisoners of war);

• representations of women in the context of the Second World War in literature, commemorative sites and practices, popular culture.

Please submit your proposals for 15-minute presentations (300 words abstract and 100 words biographical statement) to o.khromeychuk@uea.ac.uk by 5 pm on 1 February 2017.

There will be limited funding available to cover travel expenses and accommodation costs. Please indicate in your application if you wish to apply for this funding.

UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA 

THE LEVERHULME TRUST

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Playwriting Without Borders
Apr
6
to Apr 7

Playwriting Without Borders

Playwriting Without Borders

 

Wolfson College, University of Oxford, 6-7 April 2017: A two-day conference on 21st-century Russian-language playwriting in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus

One striking feature of the way Russian-language theatre has developed during the last fifteen or so years has been the extent of the collaborations between Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian playwrights and practitioners, through events such as playwriting competitions, festivals and workshops. As political tensions have increased, some of these collaborations have continued, while a number of playwrights still address themes pertinent to contemporary realities in all three nations.

We propose a conference in which this transnational dimension of Russian-language drama in the 21st century will be explored. 

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PROTAGONISTS OF POLITICAL MYTHOLOGY:  HOW DO INDIVIDUALS AND COLLECTIVES BECOME HISTORY?
Mar
25
to Mar 26

PROTAGONISTS OF POLITICAL MYTHOLOGY: HOW DO INDIVIDUALS AND COLLECTIVES BECOME HISTORY?

PROTAGONISTS OF POLITICAL MYTHOLOGY:

HOW DO INDIVIDUALS AND COLLECTIVES BECOME HISTORY?

March 25th 2017 – House of Commons, The Palace of Westminster, London

March 26th 2017 – University of Westminster, London

The concept of mythology relies not only on the content of mythic narratives, but also on the functions they perform. Within a political dimension, myth is a part of an ideological model, one that monopolises the meaning of the past by providing a retrospective, unilateral version of global, collective or individual history. Such mythological storytelling provides an identification pattern, in which the narratives fascinate, instigate and then incorporate people through mimetic mechanisms of reproducing the content in their imagination. Such patterns of receiving, cognising and reproducing, can generate a collective consciousness of the past within the present in order to implement a certain rendition of the future.

Among the politicised models of recent centuries, we hear of the figures of a messianic revolutionary proletarian in the Soviet Union, a supreme race of Aryans in national-socialist Germany, and broader senses of transnational, incorporeal,  theological capital. As discredited states and governments have gradually lost their monopoly for myth-forging, another type of mythic narrative emerges: conspiracy theories. This widespread means of interpreting the past and foreseeing the future reaches a multiplicity of domains with far-reaching consequences. This conference aims to elucidate the themes of myth and conspiracy in the world of politics and beyond.

Topics of the conference may include but are not limited to:

  • Religious roots of democratic, communist and national-socialist ideologies
  • Myth in the foundation and dissolution of unions, states and nations
  • Suggestive politics and falsifications of history
  • Conspiracy theories from the Middle Ages to Post-modernity
  • Spiritual and political minorities: religious dissidents to clandestine parties
  • Problem of verification: interpreting events in History and Political Science
  • Individual memories and retrospective interpretations of the political past
  • Ideologies in the 21st century: another return to neo-archaism?

At this event, there will be a roundtable with some of the politicians and diplomats, who actively participated in the process of the USSR dissolution, or paid witness to it as close observers.

The conference is free of charge. Hotel accommodation will be provided for the presenters and we will also aim to fully cover, or subsidise, travel expenses.

Enquiries should be directed to the organiser, Dr. Charlotte Shaw, at:  londonconferences@gmail.com

Applying to Present

Please submit your proposal of a maximum of 300 words and a short CV to: Dr. Charlotte Shaw at: londonconferences@gmail.com by the deadline of 26th February 2017.

Presenters will be allotted 15 minutes for their presentations.

This event is organised in association with BASEES and the School of History, University of East Anglia.

Other conferences in this series include:

IMPORT AND EXPORT OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION: TRANSNATIONAL EXCHANGE OF IDEOLOGIES, POLITICS, COMMUNITIES

25th - 26th February 2017; London School of Economics and Political Science

ETHOS OF EXTREMISM: SPIRITUAL VALUES AND PRAGMATIC VIOLENCE

29th - 30th April 2017; London

THE FUTURE OF POWER: HIERARCHIES, STATES, WARS, REVOLUTIONS

20th - 21st May 2017; London

 

 

 

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WESTERN EUROPE AND THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION:  IMPORT AND EXPORT OF IDEOLOGIES, POLITICS, COMMUNITIES
Feb
25
to Feb 26

WESTERN EUROPE AND THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION: IMPORT AND EXPORT OF IDEOLOGIES, POLITICS, COMMUNITIES

  • London School of Economics and Political Science (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

WESTERN EUROPE AND THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION:

IMPORT AND EXPORT OF IDEOLOGIES, POLITICS, COMMUNITIES

25th - 26th February 2017; London School of Economics and Political Science

Transnational interchanges between Western Europe and Russia surrounded the October Revolution of 1917. These exchanges of ideologies and emigres led to mutual constructions of doctrines, politicised collectives, and eventually, a new experimental State. During and post the establishment of the USSR, new cross-cultural knowledge, pro-Soviet communities and indoctrination techniques evolved. This conference will seek to explore the transnational flows that impacted the revolution and those that were brought into being by virtue of its occurrence.

 Topics may include but are not limited to:

- The Russian Revolution in global historical perspective

- Marxism and Russian culture and mentality

- Russian immigrants and Western elites on the eve of the revolution: links and future influences

- Pilgrimage to Communist Meссa: West European and American visitors in Soviet Russia

- Consequences of the Russian revolution for world politics

- Pro-Soviet communities in Western Europe and the US: official diplomacy and subversive groups

- Exporting the revolution via international solidarity

 Applying to Present

Please submit your proposal of a maximum of 300 words and a short CV to:

Dr. Charlotte Shaw at:  londonconferences@gmail.com by the deadline of 8th December 2016.  Presenters will be allotted 15-20 minutes for their presentations.

The conferences are free of charge. Hotel accommodation will be provided for the presenters and we will also aim to fully cover, or subsidise, travel expenses.

Enquiries should be directed to the organisers, Dr. Charlotte Shaw and Dr. Ilya Permyakov, at: londonconferences@gmail.com Or, to Dr. Matthias Neumann at: M.Neumann@uea.ac.uk

The conference is being organised in association with the School of History, University of East Anglia.

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60 years since 1956: the Hungarian Revolution and its aftermath in East and Central Europe
Dec
8
to Dec 10

60 years since 1956: the Hungarian Revolution and its aftermath in East and Central Europe

BASEES and the Hungarian Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade are collaborating - in this sixtieth anniversary year of the Hungarian Revolution - to stage a conference in Budapest to mark the events of 1956.
The conference will discuss all aspects of the revolution and its wider impact.

Address any enquiries to: info@basees2016budapest.org

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BASEES Annual Conference
Apr
2
to Apr 4

BASEES Annual Conference

  • Cambridge United Kingdom (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The BASEES 2016 Annual Conference will be held on 2nd-4th April 2016 and will be based as usual at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge.

Building upon the increasing successes of past BASEES conferences the BASEES Annual Conference continues to attract scholars of Slavonic and East European Studies from a wide range of disciplines from across the world.

The 2015 conference attracted more than 450 people and over 400 papers in Politics; History; Sociology and Geography; Film and Media, Languages and Linguistics; Literatures and Cultures; Economics.

The Call for Papers was issued in May 2015.

General enquiries about the conference are welcome at info@basees2016.org.

Visit basees2016.org for more information.

 

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ICCEES World Congress, Makuhari, Japan, August 3-8, 2015
Aug
3
to Aug 8

ICCEES World Congress, Makuhari, Japan, August 3-8, 2015

The ICCEES World Congress meeting will take place in Makuhari, Japan, August 3-8, 2015. The Organizing Committee accepts proposals for panels, roundtables, and individual papers. The deadline for submissions is May 31, 2014. 

More information on the guidelines for proposals, on registration fees and how to create an account and submit a proposal can be found at http://src-h.slav.hokudai.ac.jp/iccees2015/index.html

Send all queries to iccees2015@slav.hokudai.ac.jp and network via https://facebook.com/iccees2015

The brochure for the World Congress can be found here

top-head3.png
 

The International Council for Central and East European Studies (ICCEES) is the global alliance of national associations of Slavic and Eurasian studies, composed of the ASEEES (United States), CAS (Canada), BASEES (Britain), DGO (Germany), FAREES (Finland), ANZSA (Australia), CAREECAS (China), JCREES (Japan), KASS (Korea), and MACEES (Mongolia), and other respectable organizations. The ICCEES was created in 1974 and holds a world congress once every five years. The next world congress will be held in Makuhari (30 minutes from the heart of Tokyo), Japan, on August 3-8, 2015. The official languages of the congress are English, Russian, French, and German.

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Jun
11
to Jun 12

WORKSHOP | Russian Culture in the Era of Globalisation

Russian Culture in the Era of Globalisation

University of Leeds, 11-12 June 2015

Liberty Building, Moorland Road

This international workshop proposes to interrogate the role of Russian culture in forming discourses about Russia in the 21st Century. At a time when Putin’s Russia is repositioning itself in the globalised world in political and economic terms, the moment is ripe to examine the forces that shape Russia’s perceptions of itself. The workshop will be set in the context of moving beyond the late 20th Century postmodernist agenda of scepticism towards grand narratives, and will be united by the common thread of investigating whether Russia is building new grand narratives about itself and by what means.

 

Provisional schedule:    Start: 12:00 noon 11th June 2015

Finish: 14:00 12th June 2015

Fees and Registration: We invite attendees to register as audience members. There is a charge of £5 per day to cover catering costs. Please register at the following website by 1 June 2015: http://store.leeds.ac.uk/browse/product.asp?compid=1&modid=1&catid=633

Places are limited to 20 people per day.

Contact details:                Vlad Strukov v.strukov@leeds.ac.uk

Sarah Hudspith s.f.hudspith@leeds.ac.uk   

 

Confirmed speakers and titles:

Robert Saunders (Farmingdale College, SUNY) ‘Geopolitical enemy #1? Anglophone popular culture, Vladimir Putin, and politics of representation’

Elena Trubina (Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg) ‘Permsky kul’turnyi proekt (Perm Cultural Project): looking back, looking forward’

Sarah Hudspith (University of Leeds) ‘War and Peace in Putin’s Russia: 19th Century literature in contemporary Russian cultural policy’

Katharine Hodgson (University of Exeter) ‘Poetry, canon, and identity in contemporary Russia’

Vera Zvereva (University of Edinburgh) ‘"Runet" as a concept: transformations of cultural semantics and discourse’

Saara Ratilainen (University of Tampere & Aleksanteri Institute, University of Helsinki) ‘Independent and popular? Youth amateur TV in contemporary Russia’

Stephen Hutchings (University of Manchester) ‘Projecting Russia in a globalised media ecology: recursive nationhood and international broadcasting under Putin’

Vlad Strukov (University of Leeds) ‘Between glamour and shit: Russian cinema, government policy and popular debate in the Putin era’

Maria Engstrom (Dalarna University, Sweden) ‘Conservative  revolution in contemporary Russian art’

Polly McMichael (University of Nottingham) ‘Russian rock music in the early 21st century: Between sincerity and cynicism’

Lara Ryazanova-Clarke (University of Edinburgh) ‘New era, new discourse: a turn to linguistic violence’

Mikhail Suslov (Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies) ‘Russian Orthodox Church in search of a cultural canon’

Viktor Apryshchenko (South Federal University, Rostov-na-Donu) ‘Creating the history of the future: Russian historical memory in the era of the Ukrainian crisis’

Directions to the venue: The event will be held in the Liberty Building, School of Law, Moorland Road,

University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (if using SatNav please use postcode LS6 1AN).

The Liberty Building is situated on the corner of Moorland Road and Belle Vue Road on the Western Campus of the University of Leeds. It is situated behind the Maurice Keyworth Building (Business School). It is shown on the campus map as building no 16: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/campusmap

From Leeds train station, it is a 30 minute walk or you can take a taxi for around £5.00.

Alternatively the number 56 bus runs from Albion Street via Woodhouse Lane (A660) and stops on Moorland Road. These run every 10 minutes.

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May
21
to May 23

CFP: Studies in Russian literature: self-reflection, geo-cultural variability, and the limits of vocation

Studies in Russian literature: self-reflection, geo-cultural variability, and the limits of vocation
Conference
Call for Papers
Sofia, Bulgaria, 21-23 May 2015


1. A scholar’s repertoire, just as a writer’s one, is circumscribed by his or her habitus: his or her unique place in a field of production, or, ideally, the individual refraction and outcome of the field’s development up to a given moment in time. 
It is intuitively evident to us that a scholar’s choice of themes, writers, works and methods is geo-culturally and existentially determined as well. 
Having in mind studies in Russian literature, we would like to propose for discussion the following questions: Could we speak of a correlation between a social habitus and a geographical habitation (and why not between a habitus and a “place-development” as well)? And between a habitus and a (non)adherence to the existential imperative of ‘unity of life and work’? 
Lastly, how are the scope, contents and limits of literary scholarship – as produced by particular individuals occupying particular habituses – shaped by the simultaneity of geo-cultural conditionedness, existential self-consciousness and contemporary economisation of knowledge? 
2. Our attention to geo-cultural conditionedness of literary scholarship is connected with our concern in scholarly self-reflection. 
The simplest form of geo-cultural self-consciousness of a literary scholar is to pay attention to a local (regional, national) writer who has inhabited the scholar’s neighbourhood trying to relate him or her to a group of canonised authors; or to pay attention to local (and so on) themes and topoi/loci with authors and works that are anyway under focus/ have already been attended to. However, we would prefer to transcend these forms of geo-cultural literalism. 
The efforts to understand our own stances have lead, as one provisional result among others, to evoking the notion of ‘unimportant/minor other’. Russian literature-centrism, the imperative of unity of life and work, the vocation of a literary scholar and a specialisation in Russian literature – how do they look from the standpoint of, for example, a [Russia’s] ‘unimportant other’ (semi-periphery, “near abroad”, emigration)? How are they experienced from there (here)?
One can ask whether the category of geo-cultural conditionedness is applicable to Russian studies conducted in Russia (and to studies in whatever literature that are conducted in Russia). State policy (including the practice of labour allocation (raspredelenie)) has indirectly stimulated the growth of a kind of a nomadic self-consciousness as well as made more acute self-conscience’s historical and personological aspects: the feelings of living in a certain time and of personal loyalty to a teacher who had by accident – or by “allocation” – found him- or herself at a place where he or she happened to establish a kind of continuity and even a school. However it seems to us that such kind of ‘nomadism’ and ‘nomadic’ self-consciousness could be conceptualised in geoculturological terms. 
The issue of geo-cultural conditionedness of studies in Russian literature addresses, of course, the issue of multifarious conditionedness of knowledge in social sciences and humanities. 
3. The simplest form of existential self-consciousness is, as it seems to us, to question oneself about the (un)conditionedness and (un)evitability of one’s own stances and ways. Such expressions as “a/the poet’s fate/road” could hardly be considered as mere formulae; moreover, they could mask a scholar’s idea or intuition of his or her own self. 
The imperative of unity of life and work is an issue which could be analysed, of course, against the background (of our ideas of) modernisation. In the modern era, vocational realisation seems or is expected to release from the burden of the mentioned imperative (thus, for example, a producer of scholarship that is fairly “up-to-date” and “convertible” “in the West” can naturally act in favour of a “feudal” organisation of scholarship as an institution, at least “at home”).
The imperative of unity of live and work, or of existential integrality, can be derived from the Christian culture of personality; and, besides, it can be considered a distinctive feature of Russian literary culture of the 19th–20th centuries. But to what extent the type, or model, of personality that is socially and fictionally forged following the mentioned imperative is stable, and to what extent does it permeate literary scholarship? How does it correlate with the logic of the literary field? 
Have literary scholarship in Russia and scholarship of Russian literature been infected by it? 
Is that imperative discernible in the literary and intellectual cultures to which Russian literary and intellectual culture of the 19th–20th centuries has been a partner of importance?
Has the ‘media-centric redaction’ of the classical Russian culture – that is, the ongoing audio-visual re- and overproduction of classical texts and of educatedness that has nurtured and has been nurtured by them – been infected by the imperative? 
Does the imperative correlate with the temporal structure of a literary field (and of the Russian literary field), and, in particular, with what can be called the ‘elasticity’ of a literary field? How long a field ‘is willing’/ is able/ is ready to postpone the moment of repaying the writer for his or her “long-term investment”? (We refer to Pierre Bourdieu’s idea of two kinds of investments performed by the actors within the cultural field: one relying on immediate profits and the other on posthumous recognition.) What is the field’s tempo of transforming the writer-martyr into a writer-martyr-and-truimpher? (We refer to Gregory Freidin’s idea that in the Russian culture of the 19th century emerged and in the 20th century flourished the cult of the poet as martyr.) Does the mentioned “elasticity” change through history? Are the two mentioned ideas combinable?
How to view the imperative of unity of life and work – as a function of a field of cultural production, as a constant value of Russian Christian culture or as an effect of a cultural sub-field hypertrophy? 
4. Non- or extra-scholarly conditionedness of the scholarly choices of a literary scholar might lead to dislocating and subrogating the sense, boundaries and contents of the vocation of a literary scholar. Literary scholarship, as (the) constitutive margin of a literary field, maintains its autonomous mode of existence through counteracting the pressures of the political field, the economical field, the ‘strong neighbour’ within the cultural field, the ‘place-development’ and the imperative of existential integrality. 
Who is then the scholar in Russian literature – an advisor to the/a throne? an intercultural mediator? a shopkeeper? a broker? a petty civil servant? a marginal instead of a holy fool? 
The condition of an “unimportant/minor other”, or an “other of minor importance” – as is the condition of an emigrant and, moreover, one born in the “near abroad” – gives the opportunity to adopt the vocation of a mediator, sometimes besides one’s vocation in the strict sense of the word. The cases of Alfred Bem, Piotr Bicilli, Roman Jacobson, Tzvetan Todorov, Julia Kristeva, Galin Tihanov are worth exploring. While selling (or “selling”) pieces of heuristic exotics or an exotic-heuristic otherness or an otherness of importance, has the mediator the opportunity to “sell” (or sell) ‘him/herself’ (that which is his or her ‘own’)? And where the boundary lies between the stance of a mediator and the stance of someone who has accepted the “agenda” of the culture s/he studies/sells as his or her own? (The latter question applies not only to non-Russian scholars of Russian literature.)
The turn which can be provisionally designated as a ‘shift in the self-consciousness of literary scholarship under the pressure of neighbours from the field of scholarship (and, more broadly, of culture)’ is worth discussing too. Such a discussion would allow to survey: a) the range of neighbours (at least all kind of cultural studies, namely: media-, gender-, postcolonial-, confessional etc.) and the history of relations with them (e.g., re-structuring of literary studies under the pressure of broadly understood literary studies: tossing of fashionable themes and concepts, dominant tendencies within the ‘super-field’ that is common to “all” disciplines); b) institutional practices of displacement of the literary scholar and his/her resistance; c) the attitude of society to the mentioned processes and practices. 
The change in the status of the philological vocation could be viewed in relation with a hypothetic process of self-adjustment. Philology subsumes to or adopts as its own the grounding intuitions, or the self-evident truths, of other vocations and “faculties” (such intuitions and truths as ‘the world is a society’ or ‘the world is a market’ and the like). We propose paying more attention not to the semantic but to the pragmatic aspects of the mentioned turn, or shift. That a literary scholar adopts concepts, ideas and methods from, say, philosophy or sociology is less worth paying attention to than that s/he agrees to be a manager, (minor) impresario or administrator in charge of his or her own self. The imposition of project-based financing and organisation of science and scholarship (through pressure both ‘from aside’, the market, and ‘from above’, the state) can be compared with the imposition of obligatory “political literacy”. The new administrative-economical ‘super-ego’ substitutes – in the professional self-conscience of the literary scholar – the previous ‘super-ego’, the bearer of “class-party awareness”. Is this a transformation or merely mimicry? 
Does literary scholarship lose its position of a constitutive margin of the literary field? Does the change in the status of literary scholarship indicate that literary field (the Russian, the global?) enters a mode of autonomy which differs from the ‘classical’ one, described by Bourdieu through his analysis of the second half of the French 19th century? 
5. Self-reflection is, ideally, autotherapeutic. It has, besides, an epistemological meaning: it contributes to maintaining the uneasy ambivalence of being both ‘within’ and ‘outside of’, both in deliberation and in action. 
6. Which from the already ‘ready’ ‘languages’ of self-reflection is more adequate and timely to be adopted by literary scholarship? The language of reflective sociology? Of member-of-intelligentsia’s conscience? Of psychoanalysis? Of Christian confession? 
7. We welcome reasoned objections to any of the propositions shared in this call. We invite scholars and historians of scholarship to discuss any aspects of the theme which we might have left unattended. Contributions to elucidate (inter)national backgrounds other than that of Russian studies and disciplinary backgrounds other than literary scholarship are also welcome. 

Yordan Lyutskanov, Nina Barkovskaya, Maria Litovskaya, Alexander Medvedev


Scholarly committee: Olga Bagdasaryan (Ekaterinburg), Nina Barkovskaya (Ekaterinburg), Dagne Berżaite (Vilnius), Zahar Davydov (Toronto), Lyudmil Dimitrov (Sofia), Ornella Discacciati (Viterbo), Alexander Dmitriev (Moscow), Dmitry Dolgushin (Novosibirsk), Mark Lipovetsky (Boulder, Colorado), Maria Litovskaya (Ekaterinburg), Ludmiła Łucewicz (Warsaw), Yordan Lyutskanov (Sofia), Hristo Manolakev (Veliko Turnovo), Alexander Medvedev (Tyumen’), Nikolay Neychev (Plovdiv), Galina Petkova (Sofia), Ioanna Piotrowska (Warsaw), Marco Sabbatini (Macerata), Alexandra Smith (Edinburgh), Olga Tabachnikova (Bath), Dechka Tchavdarova (Shumen)

Organising committee: Yordan Lyutskanov (Sofia), Olga Bagdasaryan (Ekaterinburg), Galina Petkova (Sofia), Ioanna Piotrowska (Warsaw)

Submission terms and conditions:
Please send your paper proposals – in Russian (and in Russian or English – if your contribution is to elucidate (inter)national backgrounds other than that of Russian studies) language, from 150 to 300 words long, and supplemented by reference lists from three to ten references – together with contact details (names, institution, chair/ department) to mestosoznanierusistiki2015@gmail.com, with a copy to jordan.ljuckanov@abv.bg
Paper proposals which do not meet the formal requirements shall not be considered. Paper proposals shall be accepted only upon positive decision of the scholarly committee. All personal information shall be removed before sending the proposals for review.
The working language of the conference shall be Russian.
The regular participation fee is 80 EUR; early bird payers shall be charged 70 EUR and doctoral students – 60 EUR (upon e-mailing an attesting document). Payment shall be possible via the bank account of Institute of Literature of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and via person-to-person transfer (details shall be given later). 

Time schedule:
1. Deadline for sending paper proposals: 15 November 2014. 
2. Notification of acceptance/ rejection: 15 January 2015. 
3. Deadline for early bird payment: 15 February 2015.
4. Final deadline for payment of the registration fee: 1 May 2015.


This conference follows the conference “Russian literature today: the challenges/trials of messianism and mass culture” organised by Yordan Lyutskanov, Radostin Rusev and Hristo Manolakev and held in Sofia, 23-25 May 2013. 
The majority of papers delivered at that conference made a thematic (the 44th) issue of the journal Toronto Slavic Quarterly, in Russian. 
A revised variant of the selection, and in English, is under print with Cambridge Scholars Publishing (Newcastle, UK).

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BASEES Annual Conference
Mar
28
to Mar 30

BASEES Annual Conference

The BASEES 2015 Annual Conference will be held 28-30 March in 2015 and will be based as usual at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge.

Building upon the increasing successes of past BASEES conferences the BASEES Annual Conference continues to attract scholars of Slavonic and East European Studies from a wide range of disciplines from across the world.

The 2014 conference attracted more than 430 people and over 380 papers in Politics; History; Sociology and Geography; Film and Media, Languages and Linguistics; Literatures and Cultures; Economics.

Registration for the conference is now open

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Feb
28
12:00pm12:00pm

CFP: New Perspectives on Censorship under Communism

  • University College, University of Oxford (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Deadline for Abstracts: 28th February 2015

Final paper submission: 10th October 2015

Censorship played a crucial role in the production and dissemination of information and artistic production in a communist states, whether imposed by the state apparatus or carried out by an individual; in these countries the existence of repressive state censorship organs was supplemented by a strong tradition of informal self-censorship. This conference seeks to explore the complexity of and heterogeneity of censorship under communism, problematizing the usual understanding of the phenomenon as purely destructive and violent while examining the particular trajectory along which it developed in communist countries. The conference takes an explicitly comparative approach in order to explore differences and commonalities between practices and institutions of censorship in the communist states, highlighting the variety and mutability of these practices of cultural regulation. It will examine multiple forms of censorship and their impact in different media, prompting a deeper exploration of the commonalities and differences in censorship and practices.

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers on censorship under communism. Speakers may wish to consider, but are by no means limited to, the following themes:

  • Literary censorship: state intervention in publishing; translation
  • Censorship in music and theatre
  • Media censorship: role of the audience; the impact of technology
  • Censorship as a system of cultural regulation: the role of official censorship organs; the influence of the party; censors and their position in the system
  • Responses to censorship: opposition; samizdat; 'Aesopian' language
  • Informal censorship practices: self-censorship; editorial censorship
  • Theorising censorship in communist states

Please email 300 word abstracts and a short CV to samantha.sherry@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk by 28th February 2015.

Decisions will be notified by 31st March 2015. Full papers should be submitted by 10th October 2015 and will be pre-distributed to speakers before the conference. An edited volume or journal special issue featuring selected contributions is planned.

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Feb
15
5:30pm 5:30pm

CFP: Platform Ukraine Conference 2015

Platform Ukraine, a multidisciplinary attempt to analyse the Ukraine crisis of 2014 and the post-Soviet space more broadly, welcomes proposals for its 2015 conference. The project aims to provide a unified resource and network of academics studying the area. The conference will also mark the one-year anniversary of the project, which has been running since May 2014. The panels will be the culmination of a year of workshops and other events that have attempted to push the boundaries of interdisciplinarity.

The conference will take place on June 5th and 6th 2015 at the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), London. We invite multidisciplinary proposals that attempt to use novel research methods in order to improve and advance cooperation between various disciplines. Such methods combined with interdisciplinarity can help provide common perspectives on the area, as well as a much-needed layer of objectivity. 

The conference will be organised around the following themes:

·       Arts & literature in times of crisis

·       Social change & judicial reform

·       Nationalism & identity

·       Methodological issues (studying the post-socialist region; studying conflict/post--conflict areas)

·       Everyday (and gendered) experiences of protest & conflict

·       Interpreting the post-socialist space

·       Corruption

·       Health

·       Energy

·       Formal & informal structures of power

We welcome proposals from all disciplines listed below:

·       Anthropology

·       Art

·       Biology

·       Business

·       Chemistry

·       Economics

·       Finance

·       Film

·       Geography

·       Health science

·       History

·       International relations

·       Law

·       Linguistics

·       Literature

·       Mathematics

·       Media studies

·       Medicine

·       Philosophy

·       Political science

·       Psychology

·       Sociology

We are particularly interested in contributions that expand on the themes developed during Platform Ukraine’s workshop series (see www.platformukraine.com for a list), but will also welcome panels that propose to explore new themes from a multidisciplinary perspective. We invite any researchers with novel or particularly relevant methodological approaches to apply and to present. Platform Ukraine has featured an ongoing blog about its work, as well as numerous collaborations. The outcomes of this conference will be published in a special issue of a journal (details to be confirmed). It is hoped that the event will help frame the Ukrainian crisis in a larger context, both spatially and temporally, and to build a multidisciplinary academic resource on the topic. The conference will be held in English.

Proposal Information 

We invite proposals for individual papers or panels. Panels must be highly interdisciplinary based on the strict criteria adhered to by the project (see previous events for examples). Individual papers should be as multidisciplinary as possible or should use novel methodology that can be applied in other disciplines. Applications must include:

·       Contact information: the name, email and academic affiliation of the applicant.

·       An abstract no longer than 400 words.

·       A biographical statement no longer than 200 words written in narrative format (in the form of a paragraph) rather than a CV.

·       For panel proposals, a 400-word description of the panel alongside panellists’ names, affiliation and contact details, and a 400-word abstract (including brief a biographical statement) for each paper giver.

Paper proposals should be submitted here: http://form.jotformeu.com/form/42732070208345

Panel proposals should be submitted here: http://form.jotformeu.com/form/42732750597361 

The deadline for proposals is 5pm GMT on February 15th 2015. Applicants will be notified about selection by the end of March 2015 at the latest.

Funding: Limited travel funding is available for the conference. Accommodation arrangements may be possible through partner organisations. Please feel free to contact info@platformukraine.com if you have any questions. We look forward to hearing from you and receiving your proposal.

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Feb
12
to Feb 13

CFP: Contemporary Hungarian Studies Postgraduate Conference: Multidisciplinary European Perspectives

Call for Papers
Contemporary Hungarian Studies Postgraduate Conference: Multidisciplinary
European Perspectives

12-13 February 2015
University of Glasgow


Hungary is a dynamic political and cultural space that has been in constant transformation since 1989, and where political developments since 2010 in particular have attracted considerable international attention. Although the country’s current political trajectory has already invited a great deal of commentary from within as well as beyond its borders, further critical analysis is still required. At the same time, Hungary’s social and cultural present also deserves further scrutiny by the international scholarly community.

Since the 2010 election victory of Viktor Orbán’s nationalist Fidesz party, Hungary has undergone radical and sweeping changes to its political and economic order, provoking debates on the limits of democracy and the rule of law within the European Union. Furthermore, due to an increased role for the far right within mainstream government and shifts in spheres of interest in both domestic and international politics, Hungary has emerged as an important case study for reflections on post-socialist states in the 21st century. Therefore, increased scholarly attention is essential for understanding Hungary’s current social, political and cultural landscape. The broad themes of post-socialism, nation and identity, and contemporary Hungary’s place in the wider European political and socio-economic context are of particular importance. 

This need for a renewed discussion on Hungary that compliments or critically reflects on existing discourses forms the basis of this postgraduate conference. The term ‘Hungarian Studies’ can encompass a range of multidisciplinary perspectives and contemporary critical frameworks through which Hungary can be examined. Therefore, submissions to the 2015 Contemporary Hungarian Studies Postgraduate Conference are invited from a wide variety of academic disciplines.

We welcome papers on the following topics, among others:


• Europeanisation, integration, and public policy
• Post-socialism and Neoliberalism
• Nationalism, identities, Minority Studies (e.g. Roma Studies)
• Gender, sexualities, and Queer
• Language change, translation, literature and literary criticism
• Human geographies
• Ethnography and Folkloristics


Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and accompanied by a short biographical note and details of institutional affiliation. Submissions and queries should be sent to 
hungarianstudiesconference@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is 14 November 2014.


For further information, follow us on Twitter @hungarianconf or see our Facebook page [https://www.facebook.com/hungarianstudiespgconference] and blog [https://hungarianstudiesconference.wordpress.com].

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Feb
6
to Feb 7

CFP: The Black Sea in the Socialist World

The Black Sea in the Socialist World

Birkbeck College, University of London
February 6-7, 2015

Sponsored by the British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies

Call for Papers

In May 1962, shortly before the Cuban Missile Crisis, Soviet premiere Nikita Khrushchev toured Bulgaria. Under banners declaring “Forward, to Communism!” at a mass meeting in Varna, a Bulgarian health resort, Khrushchev lauded the Bulgarian people for the way in which they had developed the Black Sea coastline. Model health resorts like Varna, which drew visitors from all over the world, were the pride of the Bulgarian people, he claimed. These resorts demonstrated the commitment of the socialist states to the health and welfare of the people. He contrasted the health resorts on the socialist side of the Black Sea to the NATO missile build-up across the sea in Turkey. The health resorts of the Black Sea demonstrated the peace-loving nature of the socialist states to the world. “The Black Sea should be a sea of peace and the friendship of the peoples,” he argued.

While interest in the place of the Black Sea in the history of tourism, public health and architecture has grown rapidly in recent years, leading to ground-breaking studies, these works have treated each topic and national context in isolation. Works on Cold War diplomacy, too, have not taken into full consideration the position of the Black Sea as a site of cultural and political diplomacy in the socialist world. This workshop seeks to bring together historians studying the Black Sea or whose work involves the Black Sea from a variety of perspectives and both historians of the Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc. The objective of the workshop is to develop the idea of the Black Sea littoral as an international meeting place of the socialist world.

As Khrushchev’s words suggested, the idea of the socialist Black Sea was closely linked to ideas of health and welfare during times of peace. The Black Sea littoral became a favoured health retreat of the political elite and soon became a setting for high politics and diplomatic negotiations. With the Yalta conference (February 4-11, 1945), the place of the Black Sea as a site of East-West diplomacy was formalized. But the Black Sea also became a place of less formal international exchange. From international children’s camps to delegation visits, at the Black Sea people from the socialist world introduced visitors from all over the world to the socialist way of life, in a Cold War contest fought over standards of living.

Participants are sought to present papers which may but will not necessarily fall into the following themes: The divided sea in the Cold War; the political context of Soviet-Turkish, East-West and socialist relations; ideas of Europe; international law; mobility, migration and tourism; commodities; socialist design and urban planning; environmental health; international congresses and festivals, and environmental history. Papers relating to all countries of the Eastern Bloc and the USSR, and which emphasize transnational and international components, are welcome.

Informal inquiries are welcome. Please send paper titles and abstracts (around 300 words) by November 15, 2014 to j.conterio@bbk.ac.uk. Workshop papers will be pre-circulated and are due January 15, 2015.

Contact Details
Dr Johanna Conterio, conference convener
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Birkbeck College, University of London
Department of History, Classics and Archaeology
26-28 Russell Square
London, United Kingdom, WC1B 5DQ
j.conterio@bbk.ac.uk

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/reluctantinternationalists

 

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Feb
2
5:00pm 5:00pm

CFP: Peripheral Histories? Postgraduate Research into the Late-Imperial Russian and Early-Soviet Provinces, Localities, and Republics

We are delighted to announce a one-day postgraduate conference, sponsored by BASEES, CEELBAS, and artsmethods@manchester, to be held at the University of Manchester on Friday, April 17, 2015.

Peripheral Histories? will bring together postgraduates currently conducting and preparing to conduct historical research into the provinces, localities, and republics of the Russian Empire and USSR.  Since 1991 and the opening up of provincial cities and archives to foreign researchers, the study of locations outside of Moscow and St. Petersburg has expanded dramatically, producing a number of significant historical works and prompting a new wave of postgraduate research.  Nonetheless, academic networks in this important and growing area of historical research can be developed further and the challenges facing postgraduates researching late-Imperial and early-Soviet histories outside the Russian capitals are numerous.  This conference seeks to facilitate the continued expansion and integration of this historical field by providing a forum for postgraduate researchers to present their work and exchange research experiences and techniques.

The conference consists of three separate panels for postgraduate researchers to present and discuss their work.  It will conclude with a roundtable discussion of the challenges and practicalities of conducting historical research outside Moscow and St. Petersburg led by established and early-career academics, including Sarah Badcock (University of Nottingham) and Jonathan Waterlow (University of Oxford).

We welcome individual paper proposals addressing any aspect of local, provincial, national, or sub-national history in the Imperial Russian and/or early-Soviet periods.  These may include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • Interactions on the “periphery”:
    • social, ethnic, and national relations at local, provincial, and national level
    • cross-border interactions in Imperial Russian and Soviet borderlands
    • centre visions of the “periphery” and local visions of the centre
  • Imperial Russia and the USSR as imperial spaces:
    • Imperial Russia and the USSR in comparative imperial and international context
    • construction of Imperial, colonial, and orientalising identities within Imperial Russia and the USSR
    • local elites and their interactions with central authorities
  • Municipal government and self-administration:
    • localisation of political, economic, and cultural authority
    • development of local administration and practices
    • relations between local and central governmental structures

Papers will be allotted 15-20 minute slots.  Interested participants should submit an abstract of up to 250 words, as well as a list of key words and their institutional affiliation, to alistair.dickins@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk by Monday, February 2, 2015.  Responses to proposals will be given by Friday, February 27, 2015.

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Jan
3
to Jan 6

CFP: Kazakhstan’s Environmental Challenges in a Eurasian and Global Perspective

Nazarbayev University, Astana, Kazakhstan
3-6 January 2015
Organisers: Dr Beatrice Penati (Nazarbayev University) and
Prof. David Moon (York University, UK)

We invite applications from EARLY-CAREER SCHOLARS (up to 10 years from Ph.D./Kandidat nauk) at Kazakh and UK Universities to take part in a Workshop on 
Kazakhstan’s Environmental Challenges in a Eurasian and Global Perspective.
We welcome proposals on both the environmental history of Kazakhstan and on Eurasia and other parts of the Globe for purposes of comparison.

UK participants are very welcome to present research on other regions of the globe. 

The programme includes panels, keynote lectures, a networking session, advice on professional development and research funding, and a documentary film night
Successful applicants’ expenses (travel, accommodation, subsistence) will be paid by the British Council.

(The working language will be English.)

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
 

Please send (all in English):


o A letter explaining your motivation to participate (one page)
o A CV, with degrees, employment, publications, conference papers (two pages)
o An abstract of your presentation at the workshop (500-700 words)
to astana.envhis@gmail.com, by 31 October 2014
We aim to notify successful applicants by 7 November 2014
For further information, please contact us by email: astana.envhis@gmail.com

 

FURTHER INFORMATION

Kazakhstan’s Environmental Challenges in a Eurasian and Global Perspective.

The workshop will address the theme of the environmental challenges facing Kazakhstan in a historical and a wider comparative framework, encompassing perspectives from elsewhere in Eurasia (broadly defined) and the world at large. 

The economy of Kazakhstan has been growing rapidly for the past decade. This economic growth, as well as related social phenomena (in particular urbanization, energy consumption, waste production) is posing new challenges for the environment. Similarly, the country is coping with the heavy heritage of environmental issues having emerged in the Soviet period, such as the consequences of nuclear experiments in Semipalatinsk, or the desiccation of the Aral Sea, and the desertification of parts of the steppe as a result of over-grazing and incautious cultivation. In many cases, these issues transcend national frontiers and should be better apprehended in a Eurasian and global perspective.

There is a disproportion between the scale of these problems and the status of Environmental History as a discipline in Kazakhstan. While the gravity of present challenges would suggest the need for historical depth in the study of the interaction between human society and the environment in such a fragile context such as the semi-arid steppe region, in mainstream Environmental History the study of Central Eurasia has so far remained the appanage of scholars outside Kazakhstan. 

To bridge this gap, this workshop will offer a "hands-on" experience of what contemporary Environmental History is. It will bring together leading specialists from both Kazakhstan and the UK together with early-career scholars based in the UK and their Kazakhstani counterparts, so that the latter can become acquainted with current research agendas in global and transnational Environmental History. At the same time, the UK-based scholars can develop a better knowledge of the Central Asia's own historical specificities. 

The workshop will use peer-review sessions to ensure both the consolidation of a discipline-specific sensitivity and the emergence of research plans that are open to the comparison between Kazakhstan, the rest of Eurasia, and other parts of the world. Participation is limited to 13 UK-based and 13 Kazakhstan-based early-career scholars (10 years from Ph.D./Kandidate nauk).

Keynote speakers include: Dr Beatrice Penati (Nazarbayev University, Astana); Prof. David Moon (York University, UK); Dr Jonathan Oldfield (Birmingham University, UK); and Dr Renato Sala (Kazakhstan National University, Almaty).

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Dec
15
5:00pm 5:00pm

CFP: Employee Share Option Programs and Employee-Owned Companies in Central and Eastern Europe

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: 15 December, 2014 

The academic literature on employee share option programs (ESOP) and employee-owned companies (EOC) in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) is characterized by at least two omissions. First, there is a remarkable silence about the relationship between EOC and ESOPs in CEE countries—with some exceptions that prove the rule (Mygind 2012)—though ESOP has been widely used as an instrument of mass privatization in several CEE countries and has led to majority employee share ownership (ESO) in a large number of firms (Aghion & Blanchard 1998). This neglect reminds us of the fact that despite close topical, theoretical, and empirical associations, the phenomena of EOC and ESOP have scarcely been discussed together in the academic discourse at all (Dow 2003). Ironically, while the EOC literature stresses some rather negative aspects of the specific employee ownership form, such as the degenerative tendencies and a principally limited viability of EOCs, the ESOP literature mainly propagates the positive aspects of ESO, such as the positive effects on identification with the firm or productivity gains. 
Second, the academic discussion on the role of ESOPs and EOCs in the transformation process in CEE countries is rather disconnected from the long standing discourse about the potentially emancipatory role of ESOPs and EOCs in the Western world (Backhaus 1979). Moreover, there are hardly any references to the previously prominent debate about ‘labor-managed-firms` in either ‘labor-managed’ or ‘mixed’ economies, which had had a very strong theoretical basis in terms of the “Illyrian Firm” (Ward 1958; Vanek 1970; Meade 1972) or the “pure rental firm” (Jensen & Meckling 1979) despite reflecting “some degree of ideological commitment” (Hansmann 1996: 7) during the Cold War. Moreover, the implications of the rather sharp and fast decline of ESO and EOCs in the CEE countries following privatization have not yet been systematically reflected in the Western literature (Kalmi 2003). 
Thus, our current understanding of ESOPs and EOCs in CEE is not only limited by the lack of coherent empirical data, but also by the lack of a connection to the strong theoretical tradition, and by the lack of studies that compare the experiences made in CEE with the experiences made in Western countries. However, if one is interested in developing and experimenting with some alternative forms of organizing, with different forms of material and immaterial employee participation, and with democratic governance structures, the experiences with ESOPs and EOCs in the CEE countries can be analyzed more rigorously, thereby connecting them more strongly with the Western discourse and tradition. 

Against this background, Organizacija aims to publish a Special Issue on ESOP and EOC in CEE. The aims of this Special Issue are (a) to advance our knowledge on the structures and processes at the individual, organizational, and societal levels that are germane to participatory types of organization; (b) to draw lessons from the CEE experiences for the western regions; and (c) to learn about the behavior of participatory types of organization and of individuals in such organizations in different institutional settings. For this purpose, we are looking for theoretical and empirical contributions from economics, history, industrial relations, management studies, political science, and sociology, amongst others.

We welcome both theory-based empirical studies grounded in any methodological tradition (qualitative as well as quantitative), and conceptual contributions that focus on micro, meso or macro levels of analysis. Moreover, we encourage both studies that extend current theories and those questioning or even disconfirming taken-for-granted beliefs about participatory types of organization on theoretical or empirical grounds. Papers may include, but are not limited to, the following topics: 

  • The influence of public discourse about EOCs and matters pertaining to the political legitimacy of privatization on the emergence and development of EOCs
  • Traces of the Illyrian Firm or pure rental firm in a setting of free markets, private ownership, and political democracy
  • Specific country studies and comparative studies on institutional conditions for EOCs in CEE countries and their outcomes with respect to the viability of EOC
  • The influence of specific contexts of corporate governance in CEE countries on the ownership and control of EOCs
  • The influence of industrial relations in the CEE context on the viability of EOCs in CEE and the influence of EOCs on industrial relations practices
  • Efficiency and effectiveness of EOCs in CEE
  • The influence of different (countries’) experiences with worker’s self-management on the viability of EOCs after privatization
  • Comparative case-studies about the emergence of EOC during privatization and their development depending on institutional context, participatory culture, experiences with worker’s self-management and individual ownership rights
  • Transfer of EOC & ESOP models from West to East and vice versa; adaptation of models and learning barriers between East and West
  • Comparative studies about EOC as a privatization instrument in East and West
  • History, development, distribution, and outcomes of ESOP in CEE
  • The impact of ESOP on the viability of EOCs in CEE 

Procedures 
 

The following deadlines have to be observed: 

  • 15th December 2014: Submission of abstracts (maximum 1000 words) to the guest editors (thomas.steger@ur.de orolaf.kranz@wiwi.uni-regensburg.de
  • 31st January 2015: Invitations to submit full papers sent out 
  • 31st May 2015: Submission of full papers (according to the journal’s guidelineshttp://www.degruyter.com/view/j/orga, maximum 8000 words) 
  • 30th September 2015: Feedback to authors 
  • 31st December 2015: Submission of full papers with revisions 
  • 2016: Journal volume to be published 


Any further questions may be addressed to the guest editors: 
Thomas Steger / Olaf Kranz 
Department of Leadership and Organization 
University of Regensburg 
Germany.

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Dec
12
to Dec 13

CFP: Giving Voice to Cultures: Practices of Russia-Britain Cross-Cultural Communication in the 21st Century

  • The Princess Dashkova Centre (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The question of intercultural contact between Russia and Britain in the past centuries has been widely studied across disciplines. However, the 21st century – the epoch of intensified globalisation and transnational mobility – has produced new models of giving voice to cultures intended for exchange and consumption. The contemporary period has put its own mark on the ways of construction and sharing cultural knowledge of a foreign place and facilitated the emergence of new behaviours and subjectivities. A variety of intercultural links between Russia and the UK have grown to include various patterns of migration and tourism as well new forms of business, academic and cultural contacts. This takes place against the unprecedented accessibility of information including a plethora of texts and images and a growing intensity of internet communication. In both countries, spaces of domestication of respectively Russian and British cultures and hybrid cultural forms are emerging.

Contemporary patterns and practices of giving voice to cultures require new approaches to the British-Russian inter-cultural dialogue. The conference sets out to explore practices of cross-cultural communication between Russia and Britain in the 21st century. It focuses on the forms and systems of meaning making in a variety of cultural fields in dialogue. We expect that the conference will address the ways of mutual representations and cross-cultural experiences of the Russians and British expressed in the media, literature, films, theatre; the translation of cultures in art exhibitions, concerts and other art forms; linguistic and cultural exchange in diasporas, digital communities and networking sites; tourism practices and discourses (travel guides, blogs, phrasebooks, etc.); questions of linguistic and cultural commoditization, spaces of cultural exchange, and related themes.

Approaches including socio-cultural linguistics, discourse studies, media and new media studies, cultural anthropology, theatre, film, visual studies, diaspora, tourism studies, and related disciplines are welcome.

The conference will explore (but not exclusively) the following themes:

·         Approaches to the UK-Russian cross-cultural communication in the 21 century.

·         Narratives of Russia and Russianness in Britain / of Britain and Britishness in Russia (national and transnational television, travel programmes, films, theatre, performances, music, art, literature including travel writing, Internet resources, blogs, communities and networking sites, etc.).

·         Literary and non-literary translation as a cross-cultural practice.

·         Sites of cultural exchange and domestication.

·         Migration as linguistic and cultural experience. Russian diaspora in the UK as a site of cultural exchange and cultural hybridity.

·         Holidaying and tourism as forms of cultural exchange (constructing and consuming “authenticity”; experiential tourism; visiting/seeing global events: Olympic games, Championships and festivals, etc.)

·         Discourses of consumption (shopping, dining, souvenir culture, etc.)

·         Linguistic and cultural commoditization.

·         Russia's cross-cultural exchanges with other cultures: differences and similarities to the UK.

We invite proposals for full paper panels, individual papers and roundtables. Proposals including paper abstracts of 250 words accompanied by a short CV are to be submitted by no later than 15 September 2014 to Dashkova.Centre@ed.ac.uk . Authors of accepted papers will be expected to register for the conference by the pre-registration deadline of 15 October. All participants are expected to submit a full version of their paper by 30 October 2014. 

We expect that we would be able to offer a limited number of travelling grants.

Working languages of the conference are English and Russian.

The conference will take place at The Princess Dashkova Russian Centre, the University of Edinburgh, 14 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh. 

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Dec
12
to Dec 13

CFP: Giving Voice to Cultures: Practices of Russia-Britain Cross-Cultural Communication in the 21st Century

  • University of Edinburgh (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

International Conference

The Princess Dashkova Russian Centre, the University of Edinburgh

Friday 12th – Saturday 13th   December 2014

The question of intercultural contact between Russia and Britain in the past centuries has been widely studied across disciplines. However, the 21st century – the epoch of intensified globalisation and transnational mobility – has produced new models of giving voice to cultures intended for exchange and consumption. The contemporary period has put its own mark on the ways of construction and sharing cultural knowledge of a foreign place and facilitated the emergence of new behaviours and subjectivities. A variety of intercultural links between Russia and the UK have grown to include various patterns of migration and tourism as well new forms of business, academic and cultural contacts. This takes place against the unprecedented accessibility of information including a plethora of texts and images and a growing intensity of internet communication. In both countries, spaces of domestication of respectively Russian and British cultures and hybrid cultural forms are emerging.

Contemporary patterns and practices of giving voice to cultures require new approaches to the British-Russian inter-cultural dialogue. The conference sets out to explore practices of cross-cultural communication between Russia and Britain in the 21st century. It focuses on the forms and systems of meaning making in a variety of cultural fields in dialogue. We expect that the conference will address the ways of mutual representations and cross-cultural experiences of the Russians and British expressed in the media, literature, films, theatre; the translation of cultures in art exhibitions, concerts and other art forms; linguistic and cultural exchange in diasporas, digital communities and networking sites; tourism practices and discourses (travel guides, blogs, phrasebooks, etc.); questions of linguistic and cultural commoditization, spaces of cultural exchange, and related themes.

Approaches including socio-cultural linguistics, discourse studies, media and new media studies, cultural anthropology, theatre, film, visual studies, diaspora, tourism studies, and related disciplines are welcome.

The conference will explore (but not exclusively) the following themes:

·         Approaches to the UK-Russian cross-cultural communication in the 21 century.

·         Narratives of Russia and Russianness in Britain / of Britain and Britishness in Russia (national and transnational television, travel programmes, films, theatre, performances, music, art, literature including travel writing, Internet resources, blogs, communities and networking sites, etc.).

·         Literary and non-literary translation as a cross-cultural practice.

·         Sites of cultural exchange and domestication.

·         Migration as linguistic and cultural experience. Russian diaspora in the UK as a site of cultural exchange and cultural hybridity.

·         Holidaying and tourism as forms of cultural exchange (constructing and consuming “authenticity”; experiential tourism; visiting/seeing global events: Olympic games, Championships and festivals, etc.)

·         Discourses of consumption (shopping, dining, souvenir culture, etc.)

·         Linguistic and cultural commoditization.

·         Russia's cross-cultural exchanges with other cultures: differences and similarities to the UK.

We invite proposals for full paper panels, individual papers and roundtables. Proposals including paper abstracts of 250 words accompanied by a short CV are to be submitted here no later than 15 September 2014. Authors of accepted papers will be expected to register for the conference by the pre-registration deadline of 15 October. All participants are expected to submit a full version of their paper by 30 October 2014. 

We expect that we would be able to offer a limited number of travelling grants.

Working languages of the conference are English and Russian.

The conference will take place at The Princess Dashkova Russian Centre, the University of Edinburgh, 14 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh. 

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Nov
30
5:00pm 5:00pm

CFP: Soviet War Propaganda on the Movie Screen, 1939-1946

Soviet War Propaganda on the Movie Screen, 1939-1946 
Cinemathèque de Toulouse 
March 12-13, 2015 

 
On March 12-13, 2015 the research program CINESOV, the institute Framespa of the 
Toulouse-le-Mirail University and the Cinematheque of Toulouse organize a conference on "Soviet War Propaganda on the Movie Screen, 1939–46". It shall take place in the framework of the "Zoom arrière" festival's movie screenings of the Cinematheque (March 6-14, 2015). 


The first aim of the conference is to contribute to the renewal of our understanding of the 
Soviet "propaganda art". The term must be seen as covering a larger field than that of political agitation and  relate also to education and to the spreading among the civil population of the knowledge of public hygiene, sanitary prevention or technical progress. On the other hand, the aim is to highlight specificities of the war propaganda which directs the use of all means of communication at a unique target. So doing our exploration of Soviet cinema relies on a great number of studies about the wartime mobilization of the movie industry by the anti-nazi coalition as well as the by the enemies.
  
On the one hand, the project addresses the whole spectrum of film production and explores on the basis of the target publics and the tasks of mobilization more than the films themselves representing Stalin and grandiose historical epics. Communications are welcome if they simultaneously explore different genres and styles (cartoons, fiction, educational films, documentaries, newsreels) and relate them to each other as far as possible. On the other hand, it is important to see the cinema in the context of all propaganda media. In the Soviet Union film traditionally occupied a central place in the agitprop. Wartime film production must be compared to the press, to radio programs, to photo reports, to posters, to literature and to the theater.
 
The conference must rethink the propaganda addressing the nation (including the populations of the territories occupied in 1939-40 and reconquered between 1941 and 1944) as well as foreign audiences. The narrative changes depending on the historical moment and the public. This is why the conference must cover the goals of the mobilization during WWII, the postwar expectations and the changes at the start of the Cold War. It will attempt a to define with precision in the propaganda for home and international use the place of a certain number of major themes such as the equality of the Soviet empire's peoples, the role of the USSR in recent European history, discourses about external enemies and so on. Papers based on a comparative approach are welcome and so are papers considering the Soviet case in a broad international context of political communication and propaganda. 

The participants are encouraged to question the notion of propaganda as such and raise the often neglected issue of its success and failure. The target audiences, the organization of screenings (availability and quality of rooms and sound, the itinerant movie shows) the 
number of copies and spectators, the political assessment of the films, the reception by the public and by the critics are fields of investigation which may furnish answers.  
Conference participants are invited to propose papers on propaganda films (fiction or 
non-fiction) on reflections on the genre as such, on the propaganda spread by certain genres of films and thematic series on the Soviet system of mobilization by the cinema as specific propaganda instrument (budget, format, distribution means) the efficacy of the use of the cinema in this framework (comparison with other media, comparison of the propaganda by the anti-nazi coalition and by the enemies) and on other media the Soviets mobilized during WWII. The participants are asked to rely in the measure of possible on hitherto unknown sources, on a large variety of documents and in particular iconographic and audiovisual material. The number of papers will be limited in order to allow the projection of longer excerpts.  
 
The working languages will be French and English. 
 
The deadline for submissions is November 30, 2015. Please send your proposals to Irina 
Tcherneva: irina.tcherneva@ehess.fr 
The selected participants will be informed in early January 2015. 

The organizers are going to pay for the stay and the meals of the participants and if possible the travel expenses. First of all the travel expenses of doctoral students, untenured researchers and Russian colleagues will be provided for.

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Nov
26
4:00pm 4:00pm

SEMINAR: The Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict: The Uses of Misuses of History

The University of Birmingham Research Group on the Caucasus and Central Asia Centre for Russian, Eurasian and European Studies, POLSIS, College of Social Sciences

The University of Birmingham

A Round-Table

Wednesday, 26 November 2014, 16:00-18:00

Lecture Room 121, Muirhead Tower, The University of Birmingham

Speakers: Ambassador Jacques Faure (Paris, ex co-chair of the Minsk Group)

                  Laurence Broers (SOAS, London)

                  Joanne Laycock (Sheffield Hallam University)

                  Kamala Imranli-Lowe (CREES/POLSIS, University of Birmingham)

Chair:        Galina Yemelianova (CREES/POLSIS, University of Birmingham)

 

Contact: Galina Yemelianova (g.yemelianova@bham.ac.uk)

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Nov
14
5:00pm 5:00pm

CFP: IARCEES Annual Conference 2015

Call for Papers

‘Memories and Identities in Central and Eastern Europe’

2015 Annual Conference of the Irish Association for Russian, Central and East European Studies

8-9 May 2015, Dublin, Trinity College Dublin

 

The conference is organized by the Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies, the Center for European Studies, the Trinity Long Room Hub, and the Irish Association for Russian, Central and East European Studies.

 The categories ‘memory’ and ‘identity’ have enjoyed significant scholarly attention in the past few decades. The upsurge of interest in memory and identity studies has affected a wide range of disciplines, including history, cultural studies, sociology, political science, and so on, and has inspired academic ventures of a truly interdisciplinary character. The ‘memory boom’ in the humanities triggered the bourgeoning of collaborative research projects, and resulted in numerous publications on the subject. Memories of traumatic events of the recent past—the Holocaust, World War II and Stalinist terror—and their impact on the transformation of individual as well as collective identities have been in the limelight of research, especially since the collapse of communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe. Still, there are many possible ways for raising new questions, and there are several themes that could be explored further, including memories of normality and their impact on the shaping of identities; the influence of postcolonial criticism on memory/identity studies; the transnational circulation of narratives; or the ramifications of the transformation of memory studies. 

The main aim of the conference is to contribute to the growth of the field by opening up new avenues of research and encouraging further academic collaboration. The conference hopes to provide a forum where both established academics and young scholars would have the opportunity to present the results of their research. While all paper proposals will be considered, the organisers would like to encourage applicants to address one—or more—of the more specific themes listed below.

  • The changing contours of memory, and memory/identity studies since the collapse of communism. Plurality, hybridity and contestation.
  • The politics of memory in post-communist(?) Eastern Europe: institutions and practices of mastering the past.
  • The impact of EU integration and the recent Euro-crisis on identity formation and memory politics.
  • Memories of normality and everyday life. The polarization of ‘everyday memories’ (nostalgia, oppression, deprivation, etc.) after the dissolution of authoritarian regimes (empires, totalitarian regimes, etc.).
  • Shifting memories and transforming identities in early modern Central and Eastern Europe. Religion, imperial expansion (Ottoman, Habsburg, German, Russian), and the origins of national identities.
  • Memories of modernity. Modernisation, empire and identity in 19th century Central and Eastern Europe.
  • The linkages between ethnic memories and (minority) identities.
  • Postcolonial narratives of memory and identity in Central and East European literature and art.
  • The transnational circulation of memories/identity narratives.
  • Reflections and approaches to memory and identity in psychology and psychiatry.

 Researchers from all related disciplines are invited to apply. The organisers are committed to ensure the interdisciplinary character of the event therefore, every attempt will be made to maintain a balanced representation of different disciplines. IARCEES members and academics from the countries of Central and Eastern Europe are particularly encouraged to apply. It is envisaged that a selection of the best papers will be published, either as an edited volume, or as a special issue of the Irish Slavonic Studies.

The deadline for the submission of proposals is 14 November 2014. The maximum length of the proposals is 400 words.

Please send your proposals to: iarcees.2015@gmail.com

For further information please contact Dr Balázs Apor at aporb@tcd.ie

Please note that IARCEES members, located in Ireland, may submit proposals that are not related to the conference theme. They will be given the opportunity to present their research in the framework of separate panels.

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SEMINAR: UEA European History Seminar Series
Oct
15
5:00pm 5:00pm

SEMINAR: UEA European History Seminar Series

Josh Sanborn (Lafayette College, USA) 'Imperial Apocalypse: The Great War and the destruction of the Russian empire'


5pm in Arts 2.07.

University of East Anglia, Norwich


Upcoming talks:

November 12

Jeremy Hicks (Queen Mary, University of London) 'Shaping the meaning of  ‘The Victory Banner over the Reichstag’ in the post-war Soviet Union'


December 2

Jon Oldfield (Birmingham) 'Soviet understandings of natural systems: Climate change debates during the Cold War period'

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Oct
13
5:00pm 5:00pm

SEMINAR: Russian and Eurasian Foreign Policies and Politics

RUSSIAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES CENTRE SEMINAR 
  
RUSSIAN AND EURASIAN FOREIGN POLICIES AND POLITICS

Convenors:  Roy Allison (St Antony’s, SIAS) & Neil MacFarlane (St Anne’s, DPIR)  
 
SESSIONS ARE HELD ON MONDAYS AT 5 P.M. IN THE NISSAN LECTURE THEATRE

 
 13 October: Roy Allison (St Antony’s College, REES/SIAS Oxford), ‘Russian intervention in Ukraine: crossing the Rubicon?’ 
 
20 October: Kataryna Wolczuk (University of Birmingham), ‘In the cross-fire of 
integration: Ukraine, the EU and Russia’ 

 
27 October: Luca Anceschi (University of Glasgow), ‘Regime neo-Eurasianism: 
rethinking the politics of foreign policy in post-Soviet Kazakhstan’ 

 
3 November: Jody LaPorte (St Hilda’s College), ‘Corruption and authoritarianism in 
Central Asia’ 

 
10 November: H.E. Ambassador Natalie Sabanadze (Georgian Ambassador to Belgium, 
Luxembourg and the head of the Georgian mission to the European Union), ‘Georgia, the 
EU Association Agreement and wider foreign policy challenges’ 

 
17 November: Tuomas Forsberg (University of Tampere), ‘Emotions in Russian foreign 
policy’ 

 
24 November: Rick Fawn (University of St Andrews), ‘Post-Soviet states and 
international norms: introducing the idea of internal conditionality’ 

 
1 December: Andrew Wilson (University College London), ‘Lessons of the Ukraine crisis’  
 

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Oct
10
9:00am 9:00am

Global networks in print: Dutch/Russian exchange in the Petrine era

This international conference is the result of an AHRC Networking grant, which has brought together academics and curators from Britain, Russia, and The Netherlands to consider Dutch-Russian exchange through the most significant moment in Russian print culture of the early modern period: Peter the Great's establishment of a Europeanised school of printmaking in Moscow. Scholars from The State Hermitage Museum, The State Russian Museum, The Russian Academy of Sciences and the Universities of Amsterdam and Cambridge will discuss the dynamism of Dutch publishing in the late seventeenth century, precedents in Williamite imagery, and the emergence and nature of Europeanised prints in the genres of portraiture, city views and folk prints. This timely consideration of Russia's historic relationship with Europe will be contextualised by Sir Anthony Brenton KCMG, British Ambassador to Russia from 2004 to 2008.

Contact: mmh43@cam.ac.uk
To register: https://globalnetworksinprint.eventbrite.co.uk

Click here for conference poster.

Click here for conference programme.

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Oct
6
6:00pm 6:00pm

SEMINAR: UCL SSEES Modern Russian History Seminar

MODERN RUSSIAN HISTORY SEMINAR

SESSIONS ARE HELD ON MONDAY AT 06:00pm IN ROOM 433

ALL ARE WELCOME

 

6 October: George Gilbert (Oxford) - Conservatives or Radicals? Right-wing factions in the final years of the Russian Empire.

20 October: Steve Smith (Oxford) - Miraculous Icons and Bolshevik Power

10 November: Polly Jones (Oxford) - Biography in late Socialism

24 November: Kristin Roth-Ey (SSEES) - "Enemy Voices": Foreign Radio Audiences in the late Soviet Union

1 December: Philippa Hetherington (Sydney) - Labour Migrant, Trafficking Victim, Refugee: The Emigrant Subject in Late Imperial Russiana and the Early Soviet Union

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Oct
4
9:00pm 9:00pm

REEM, Annual Conference 2014, MUSIC AND EMPIRE IN EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE, Durham University, Saturday 4 October 2014

British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies (BASEES)

Study Group for Russian and Eastern European Music (REEM)

 

http://www.basees.org/study-group-for-russian-and-eastern-european-music-reem/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/298919210166456/

 

Annual Conference 2014

MUSIC AND EMPIRE IN EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE
Durham University, Music Department, Concert Room, Saturday 4 October 2014
Marking 2014 as the hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of World War I, which catalysed the disintegration of European empires and the subsequent establishment of national states, BASEES/REEM would like to announce the programme for its forthcoming annual conference


Programme

 
930-1000 – Registration and Welcome
 
1000-1130 – Panel 1:
 
-          Anna Giust (Venice), ‘Catherine II’s The Early Reign of Oleg: Sarti, Canobbio and Pashkevich Serving an Idea’

-          Rebekah Mitchell (Oberlin), ‘Russkii or rossiiskii? Defining Russian Music in the Age of Empire’

-          Joseph Schultz (Durham), ‘Aram Khachaturian and the Stalinist Project of Musical “Nation Building”’

 
1130-1200 – Coffee Break
 
1200-1300 – Panel 2:
 
-          Jeanna Kniazeva (St Petersburg), ‘Three Empires and Two World Wars in the Dialogues of Musicologists (1914-1946)

-          Tatjana Marković (Belgrade), ‘The Ottoman Impact on Southeast European Music: Imperial Legacy and Opera’

 
1300-1400 – Lunch Break
 
1400-1530 – Panel 3:
 
-          Srđan Atanasovski (Belgrade), ‘The Empire Which Did Not Come to Existence: Politics of South Slav’s Early Music Folklore Explorations’

-          Ana Olic (Vienna), ‘The Construction of a Cultural Identity of Dalmatia – About Josip Hatze's Adel and Mara’

-          Verica Grmusa (London), ‘Star Persona and National Identity: The Role of Maja Strozzi-Pecic in Petar Konjovic’s Opus’

 
1530-1600 – Coffee Break
 
1600-1700 – Panel 4:
-          Christopher Bowen (North Carolina at Chapel Hill), ‘Bohemian Rhapsodist:  Antonín Dvořák’s Píseň bohatýrská and the Politics of Biography’

-          Ákos Windhager (Budapest), ‘The “Sissi Symphonies” – Pieces Inspired by and Dedicated to the Empress and Queen Elisabeth of Austria-Hungary’

 
1700-1730 – Closing Remarks
 
ATTENDANCE AT THE CONFERENCE IS FREE. NO REGISTRATION IS NECESSARY. ALL ARE WELCOME. Enquiries: reemstudygroup@googlemail.com  (www.basees.org.uk/sgreem.shtml and https://www.facebook.com/groups/298919210166456/).

 

Travelling to Durham

Durham is situated in the North-East of England. Maps of the locality and information about the university campus can be found here: http://www.dur.ac.uk/about/location/. 

For the information of delegates travelling from abroad: 

Durham is situated near two regional airports —Newcastle Airport (NCL) and Durham Tees Valley Airport (MME), which are both about 25 miles/43 km distant. It is easy to get to Durham from Newcastle Airport, which has excellent public transport links: you take the metro to Newcastle Central Station and a train from there to Durham. The usual journey time is about 1 hour. However, please be advised that the service is rather restricted at night times. If you intend to arrive at Newcastle airport on the night of Friday 3 October, you should make sure to arrive in time to catch the metro before 22.12 if you wish to connect to the last train from Newcastle Station to Durham. Otherwise you will have either to hire a taxi (which will cost about £60) or else get the metro to Gateshead Interchange and take a bus to Durham from there (the last bus currently leaves at 23.15). 

Getting to Durham from Durham Tees Valley Airport is slightly more awkward: you will have to travel by bus to Darlington train station and catch a train from there to Durham – which will take about an hour, all told. This airport also operates a very restricted roster of flights, though there are good connections to Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport (four flights a day). Alternatively, delegates travelling from abroad may find it cheaper to fly into one of the London airports or to Manchester Airport (MAN), and take the train from there to Durham — the journey is about 2 hours 45 minutes in both cases. Information about trains can be found here: http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/. 

For the information of delegates travelling by train: 

Buses run from Durham train station to Palace Green, in the heart of the old part of the city, where the Music Department premises are located (adjacent to Durham Cathedral). The service operates between 8.30-17.30. Alternatively, you could take a taxi from the station taxi rank, or even consider walking, if you are not carrying heavy luggage—you will reach the city centre within 10-15 minutes. 

Conference venue

The Music Department is situated in the historic centre of the city, right by the magnificent medieval cathedral which forms part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Concert Room, in which the study day will be held, is immediately on your right when you enter the building. 

Accommodation

Should you require accommodation in Durham, you have a wide range of accommodation options to choose from, depending on your preferences. A comprehensive list of hotels and B&Bs in the locality can be found here: http://www.thisisdurham.com/accommodation

For participants who are travelling on a limited budget, the cheapest option would probably be to book a room in one of Durham’s colleges. Several of these (such as St Chad’s and St John’s Colleges, are located with a few hundred metres of the Music Department, and offer individual rooms (with breakfast) at very reasonable rates — roughly half the price of what one would normally expect to pay for a B & B. 

Food, eating out, and shopping

Durham is a small city and everything is within easy walking distance. The city centre has a wide range of shops, cafés, and restaurants to choose from—ranging all the way from inexpensive eateries to establishments offering more formal dining. 

If you have any questions concerning the practicalities of arranging your travel or accommodation, please contact Patrick Zuk (patrick.zuk@durham.ac.uk), who will be happy to assist.

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Memorial Event for Prof. Richard Peace
Sep
19
2:00pm 2:00pm

Memorial Event for Prof. Richard Peace

The Department of Russian at Bristol is arranging an event on the afternoon of Friday 19 September to celebrate the life and achievement of Richard Peace, who died last December. 

The event will start at 2.00 pm and will consist of 6-8 tributes by former colleagues or students, from Bristol and other institutions, each devoted to a different aspect of Richard’s many-sided activity. It will also include some poetry reading and a musical element.

There will be a break of three-quarters of an hour for tea or coffee between 3.45 and 4.30 and the occasion will end with a drinks reception from around 5.30.

The tributes will be preceded by a buffet lunch, starting from 1.00, for those able and wishing to arrive beforehand. There may be a small charge for this part of the day’s catering, depending on the numbers attending.

The event will be held at a venue within the University of Bristol, but a specific venue will be announced when the Department has a better idea of the numbers planning to attend. It would therefore help the Department if you could let Derek Offord know by email or by post at the University of Bristol, Department of Russian, 17 Woodland Road, Clifton, BS8 1TE, by 21 July. There will be a message sent by the end of July to all those who have contacted the Department, giving the venue and the programme for the day. 

The Department of Russian at Bristol hopes to be able to welcome to Bristol many of Richard’s former friends, colleagues and students in order to remember the career of this internationally respected scholar, a past president of our national association of Slavists and a staunch supporter of our academic discipline in UK universities.

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