“Fifty years On”: Remembering and Forgetting the post-war revolutions in Eastern Europe

Keynote Roundtable  

Saturday, 14 April, 17:30-19:00 – Auditorium

Chair: Libora Oates-Indruchová (University of Graz, Austria)
Speakers:           
Janos Rainer
 (Head of the Institute for the History of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution)
Jacques Rupnik (CERI, Sciences Po)
Jan Kubik (SSEES, London)

Fifty years ago there were exciting events taking place in Czechoslovakia; Aleksander Dubček had become first secretary of the KSČ and political liberalisation was under way. But it was not to last long. On August 20th Soviet troops entered the country and put an end to the Prague Spring. This was neither the first nor last revolution to challenge the communist hegemony in the countries of East Central Europe.  In this keynote panel, we will be asking our speakers to remind us of these oppositional uprisings and the people involved in them, and to reflect upon how they are being re-interpreted at the present in the service of leaderships in the communist successor states.  Our speakers are Jacques Rupnik who was a student at the time of the Soviet invasion and having left Czechoslovakia her returned in 1990-2 as an adviser to president an adviser to Vaslav Havel,  Janos Reiner,  Director of the Institute for the History of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, Budapest and Jan Kubik, former Director of SSEES who will be speaking respectively about how the revolutions of the post WWII revolutions or uprisings are being commemorated (or not) in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland.

 Libora Oates-Indruchová

Libora Oates-Indruchová

Libora Oates-Indruchová is Professor of Sociology of Gender at the University of Graz (A). Her research interests include cultural representations of gender, gender and social change, censorship, and narrative research, with a focus on state-socialist and post state-socialist Czech Republic. Her recent articles include “A Dulled Mind in an Active Body: Growing Up as a Girl in Normalization Czechoslovakia” (in Childhood and Schooling in (Post)Socialist Societies: Memories of Everyday Life, ed. by Iveta Silova, Nelli Piattoeva, and Zsuzsa Millei, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) and Unraveling a Tradition, or Spinning a Myth?: Gender Critique in Czech Society and Culture“ (Slavic Review, Winter 2016). She co-edited The Politics of Gender Culture under State Socialism: an Expropriated Voice (with Hana Havelková; Routledge 2014, paperback 2015; expanded Czech edition 2015) that won the 2016 BASEES Women’s Forum Book Prize. She is currently completing a book manuscript on Czech and Hungarian post-1968 scholarly publishing and censorship.

 János M. Rainer

János M. Rainer

János M. Rainer (1957), Hungarian historian, professor of contemporary history at Eszterházy Károly University (Eger, Hungary), head of the 1956 Institute – Oral History Archive Department at the Hungarian National Széchényi Library (Budapest). Before 1989 he published in samizdat on the reprisals after 1956. His field of expertise is Hungarian history after WWII, focusing on the 1956 revolution and the Kádár-period. His two-volume biography on Imre Nagy was published in enshortened version in Polish, Russian, German and English.

 Jacques Rupnik

Jacques Rupnik

Jacques Rupnik is Director of Research at the Centre de Recherches Internationale (CERI) at Sciences Po, France, where he also serves as Professor of Political Science. He was educated at the University of Paris and at Harvard, is currently Director of Research at CERI and Professor at Sciences Po in Paris as well as visiting professor at the College of Europe in Bruges and Charles University in Prague. Since he joined CERI, Sciences Po in 1982 he has been writing and lecturing about East and Central European history and politics and European integration. He was advisor to president Vaclav Havel in the 1990’s. Executive director of the International Commission for the Balkans, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (1995-1996) and drafter of its report Unfinished Peace (1996), member of the Independent International Commission on Kosovo (1999-2000) and co-drafter of The Kosovo Report (Oxford UP, 2000). Among the various positions held: advisor to the European Commission (2007 – 2010). Member of the board of the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation in The Hague since 2010. Member of the board of directors of the European Partnership for Democracy in Brussels (2008-2013). He has been a visiting Professor in several European universities and in the Department of Government, at Harvard University where he is regularly Visiting Scholar at the Center for European Studies.

J.Rupnik has published a number of books and scholarly articles including Histoire du Parti Communiste Tchécoslovaque (1981) The Other Europe (1989), Le Printemps tchécoslovaque 1968 (1999), 1989 as a Political World Event: Democracy, Europe and the new international system, London, Routledge, ( 2013, with an introduction by V.Havel), Géopolitique de la démocratization, l’Europe et ses voisinages, Presses de Sciences Po  (2014).

 Jan Kubik

Jan Kubik

Jan Kubik is Professor at the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies and the Department of Political Science, Rutgers University in New Brunswick. His earlier publications include: The Power of Symbols against the Symbols of Power. The Rise of Solidarity and the Fall of State Socialism in Poland and Rebellious Civil Society: Popular Protest and Democratic Consolidation in Poland, 1989-1993 (with Grzegorz Ekiert). His recent work deals with the relationship between political science and cultural anthropology (Anthropology and Political Science: a convergent approach, with Myron Aronoff); critical analysis of post-communist studies (Postcommunism from Within. Social Justice, Mobilization, and Hegemony, edited with Amy Linch); and the politics of memory (Twenty Years After Communism: The Politics of Memory and Commemoration, prepared and edited with Michael Bernhard). Among his research interests are: culture and politics; civil society, protest politics and social movements; communist and post-communist politics; the rise of populism; and interpretive and ethnographic methods in political science. He received M.A. (sociology and philosophy) from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland and Ph.D. (anthropology, with distinction) from Columbia University.

Human Rights in the Region: Domestic and International Perspectives

Keynote Roundtable  

Friday, 13 April, Auditorium 12:30-13:30

Chair: Judith Pallot (BASEES President)
Speakers :
Mary McAuley
 (Independent Scholar)
Sergey Golubok (St. Petersburg Bar Association)
Heather McGill (Amnesty International)
Dalia Leinarte (UN Committee on the Elimination of    Discrimination against Women, UN [CEDAW])

By the time delegates will have convened for this year’s annual conference, Russians will have just voted in their seventh President. The election will have taken place against a backdrop of concerns about just how free and fair the electoral process is in Russia and whether the movement towards greater democratisation in the country is stalled. No less than in Russia events in East Central Europe during the last decade have raised similar concerns, which are particularly poignant given that 2018 is the fiftieth anniversary of the Prague Spring and its suppression by Soviet armed forces.  Our guest speakers in the opening keynote session, are all involved in different ways in promoting human rights in Russia and across the BASEES region either through their practical work or scholarship.  The session will begin with Mary McAuley, who interviewed the leading human rights activists for her recent book “Human Rights in Russia: Citizens and the State from Perestroika to Putin” to introduce the topic discussing the changing face of human rights activism from the end of the Soviet period to present day. She will be followed by our three other speakers, all of whom are involved in different ways in defending human rights; human rights lawyer Sergey Golubok, who represents parties in cases heard before the Russian courts, including the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court, and before courts in Belarus and the European Court of Human Rights; Heather McGill, from Amnesty International who has been in charge of research on Belarus, Ukraine and the author of a recently published report of prisoners transportation in the Russian federation, and Dalia Leinarte, Professor of History at the University of Vilnius and currently chairperson of the UN The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) whose brief is to advance gender equality and human rights for women and girls around the world.

 Mary McAuley

Mary McAuley

Mary McAuley (M.A., D. Phil. Oxon) left an academic career, as Fellow in Politics at St Hilda’s College, Oxford, in 1995 to head the Ford Foundation’s Moscow office, with particular responsibility for supporting human rights and legal reform.  In May 2002 she returned to London, where, as an Associate of the International Centre for Prison Studies (then at King’s College, London) she wrote on juvenile justice. Publications include: Russia’s Politics of Uncertainty, Cambridge University Press, 1997; Deti v tiurme , OGI, Moscow, 2008; Children in Custody: Anglo-Russian Perspectives, Bloomsbury Academic, 2010; Human Rights in Russia: Citizens and the State from Perestroika to Putin, I B Tauris, April 2015

 ergei Golubok

ergei Golubok

Sergei Golubok (LL.M. in International Human Rights Law (University of Essex, United Kingdom), Ph.D. in International Law and European Law (St Petersburg State University, Russia) has work experience with Registry of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg (2008-2011). Since 2011 he is a practicing attorney in Russia, member of the St Petersburg Bar Association, mostly representing applicants before the European Court of Human Rights and the Constitutional Court of Russia, and conducting criminal defense. In 2017 Dr Golubok was elected by his colleagues to serve as a Board member of his Bar Association. He is also member of the European Criminal Bar Association and associate member of the International Criminal Court Bar Association. In 2017 Sergei was awarded a prize for human rights litigation by the Moscow Helsinki Group. Available on Facebook: Sergey Golubok and on Instragram: goluboksergey.

 Heather McGill

Heather McGill

Heather McGill graduated with an M.A. in Political Science from McGill University. Since 1990 she has worked in various roles with Amnesty International. Her first job was as USSR Field Officer, training and assisting Amnesty International activists in the former Soviet Union and then as researcher covering the Western CIS, Russia and since 2017 Central Asia. She has researched and published reports on the death penalty in Belarus, violence against women in Belarus and Ukraine, the investigation of torture allegations in Ukraine and Moldova and most recently a report on Prisoner Transportation in Russia. She is currently researching the issue of legal capacity and mental disability in Kazakhstan. 

 Dalia Leinarte

Dalia Leinarte

Dalia Leinarte is Professor of History and Chairperson of the UN CEDAW Committee. Leinarte writes extensively on women and family in Imperial Russia, and former Soviet Union. She is an author of The Lithuanian Family in its European Context, 1800-1914: Marriage, Divorce and Flexible Communities (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) and Adopting and Remembering Soviet Reality: Life Stories of Lithuanian Women, 1945–1970 (Brill, 2010). Dalia Leinarte has received national and international recognition. In her country she is a recognized gender equality expert and defender of women’s rights. An especially strong example of the recognition of her work is that in 2012 the Lithuanian government nominated her as a candidate for the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, UN (CEDAW). She was successfully elected.

1917 Centenary – The Russian Revolution in Historical Perspective

Keynote Roundtable

Saturday, 1 April, 17:45-19:00 – Auditorium

Chair: Peter Waldron (University of East Anglia)
Speakers : Natalia Pushkareva (President of the Russian Association for Research in Women’s History)
Richard Sakwa (University of Kent)
Julie Curtis (University of Oxford)
Christopher Read (University of Warwick)
Mark Harrison (University of Warwick)

 Natalia Pushkareva

Natalia Pushkareva

Professor Natalia Pushkareva is Chief Research Fellow and Head of the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at the Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Russian Academy of Sciences. She is President of the Russian Association for Research in Women’s History (RAIZhI) and Member of the Board of the International Federation for Research in Women's History. Her research interests include gender history, the history of family relations, social anthropology, and the history of sexuality in Medieval, Modern and contemporary Russia.  She has published widely, in Russian and in English, in the academic and popular press. Her works include: Women in Medieval Rus (Moscow, 1989); Women in Russia and Europe at the Dawn of the Modern Age (Moscow, 1996), Women in Russian History from the Tenth to the Twentieth Century (Sutton Publishing, 1997), Private Life of Russian Women: Bride, Spouse, Mistress (Moscow, 1997); Sexual Culture in Russia from the 10th to the XIXth c. (Moscow, 1999), Russian Women: Past and Present (Moscow, 2002); Gender Theory and Historical Sciences (St Petersburg, 2007). She sits on a number of international Editorial Boards: for the book series Gender Studies in the Humanities (St Petersburg), Gender Studies (Kharkov, Ukraine), Adam & Eve: Yearbook of Gender History (Moscow), Glasnik etnografskogo instituta SANU (Croatia), Blgarska Etnologia (Bulgaria), Aspasia: Yearbook of Gender History (Netherlands).

 Richard Sakwa

Richard Sakwa

Richard Sakwa is Professor of Russian and European Politics at the University of Kent at Canterbury and an Associate Fellow of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at the Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House. After graduating in History from the London School of Economics, he took a PhD from the Centre for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Birmingham. He held lectureships at the Universities of Essex and California, Santa Cruz, before joining the University of Kent in 1987. He has published widely on Soviet, Russian and post-communist affairs. Books include Communism in Russia: An Interpretative Essay, published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2010 (with a Russian version published by Rosspen in 2011), The Crisis of Russian Democracy: The Dual State, Factionalism and the Medvedev Succession (Cambridge University Press, 2011), Putin and the Oligarch: The Khodorkovsky - Yukos Affair (London and New York, I. B. Tauris, 2014) and Putin Redux: Power and Contradiction in Contemporary Russia (London and New York, Routledge, 2014). His latest book is Frontline Ukraine: Crisis in the Borderlands, an extended paperback version of which was published by I. B. Tauris in 2016. He is currently working on Russia against the Rest: The Post-Cold War Crisis of World Order (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2018).

 Julie Curtis

Julie Curtis

Julie Curtis is a Professor of Russian Literature and Fellow of Wolfson College, University of Oxford.  She is the author of three books about Mikhail Bulgakov, the most recent a new biography published by Reaktion Books in February 2017. She has also written a biography of Evgeny Zamiatin (ASP, 2013), and co-edited the 2011 scholarly edition in Russian of his novel Мы. Her current research projects (under the auspices of the AHRC OWRI grants awarded to the Universities of Oxford and Manchester) are on 21st-century theatre in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus.

 Chris Read

Chris Read

Chris Read is Professorial Fellow in Modern European History at the University of Warwick. He has written widely on the social, political and cultural history of Russia in the revolutionary period. His most recent books are: War and Revolution in Russia 1914-1922: The Collapse of Tsarism and the Establishment of Soviet Power, Palgrave, London, 2014 and the biographies Lenin: A Revolutionary Life, Routledge London 2005 and, most recently, Stalin: From the Caucasus to the Kremlin, Routledge London 2017.

 Mark Harrison

Mark Harrison

Mark Harrison is a professor of economics at the University of Warwick and a research fellow of the University of Birmingham. He has worked on the economic history of the Soviet Union and of the two world wars. His current research is on KGB surveillance. His latest book is One Day We Will Live Without Fear (Hoover Institution Press, 2016).

Reflection on the Collapse of the Soviet Union

Keynote Roundtable

Friday, 31 March, Auditorium 17:30-19:00

Chair: Richard Sakwa (University of Kent)
Speakers: Gennady Burbulis (State Secretary of Russia, 1991-92)
Leonid Kravchuk (First President of Ukraine, 1991-94)
Stanlislau Shushkevich (First Head of State of Independent Belarus, 1991-94)

Panel organizer: Dr Ilya Permyakov  and the PHENOMEN TRUST

We would like to thank the PHENOMEN TRUST for its generous support in organising this event.

 Gennady Eduardovich Burbulis

Gennady Eduardovich Burbulis

(Russian: Геннадий Эдуардович Бурбулис; born August 4, 1945) is a Russian politician. A close associate of Boris Yeltsin, he held several high positions in the first Russian government, including Secretary of State, and was one of the drafters and signers of the Belavezha Accords on behalf of Russia. He was one of the most influential Russian political figures in the late 1980s and early 1990s and one of the main architects of Russian political and economic reform.

 Leonid Makarovych Kravchuk

Leonid Makarovych Kravchuk

(Ukrainian: Леонід Макарович Кравчук; born 10 January 1934) is a former Ukrainian politician and the first President of Ukraine, who served from 5 December 1991, until his resignation on 19 July 1994. He is also a former Chairman of the Verkhovna Rada and People's Deputy of Ukraine serving in the Social Democratic Party of Ukraine (united) faction. After a political crisis involving the President and the Prime Minister, Kravchuk resigned from the Presidency, but ran for a second term as President in 1994. He was defeated by his former Prime MinisterLeonid Kuchma, who served as President for two terms. After Kravchuk's presidency, he was active in Ukrainian politics, serving as a People's Deputy of Ukraine in the Verkhovna Rada and the leader of Social Democratic Party of Ukraine (united)'s parliamentary group (from 2002 to 2006). He is currently retired from politics.

 Stanislau Stanislavavich Shushkevich

Stanislau Stanislavavich Shushkevich

Belarusian: Станісла́ў Станісла́вавіч Шушке́віч Łacinka: Stanisłaŭ Stanisłavavič Šuškievič
Russian: Станисла́в Станисла́вович Шушке́вич

(Born December 15, 1934 in Minsk) is a Belarusian politician and scientist. From September 28, 1991 to January 26, 1994 he was the first leader and head of state of independent Belarus after the dissolution of the Soviet Union (Chairman of the Supreme Soviet - also chairman of Parliament). He supported free market and democratic reforms and played a key role in the creation of the Commonwealth of Independent States. As a scientist, he is a Corresponding Member of the Belarusian Academy of SciencesDoctor in Physics and Mathematics, recipient of various state awards, professor, and the author and originator of textbooks and over 150 articles and 50 inventions.

1917 Centenary – Studying the Russian Revolution

Keynote Roundtable

Friday, 31 March, Auditorium 12:30-13:30

Chair: Judith Pallot (BASEES President, University of Oxford)
Speakers: Sarah Badcock (University of Nottingham)
Steve Smith (University of Oxford)
Boris Kolonitskii (European University as St Petersburg)

 Sarah Badcock

Sarah Badcock

Sarah Badcock is Associate Professor in history at the University of Nottingham. Her research focuses on Russia in the late Imperial and revolutionary periods. She is interested in comparative perspectives on questions of punishment, free and unfree labour, and penal cultures. Her most recent book, A prison without walls? Eastern Siberian exile in the last years of Tsarism will be published by Oxford University Press in November 2016. She spent several years researching ordinary people’s experiences of the Russian revolution. This research culminated in a book published by Cambridge University Press in 2007, Politics and the People in Revolutionary Russia; A provincial history. Badcock’s interest in regional perspectives on the Russian revolutions continued with a collaborative project, and she recently published an edited collection of essays exploring Russia’s revolutions from regional perspective, along with her friends and colleagues Liudmila Novikova (Higher School of Economics, Moscow) and Aaron Retish (Wayne State University), entitled Russian Home Front In War And Revolution, 1914-22: Book 1. Russia’s Revolution In Regional Perspective. (Slavica, 2015). 

 Daniel Orlovsky

Daniel Orlovsky

Professor Daniel Orlovsky is a specialist in the history of the Provisional Government after the February Revolution of 1917 and he continues to study the history of a much understudied hidden class of Soviet citizens, people who were neither workers nor peasants—the white collar “employees” of the Soviet
Union between 1918 and 1956.

He has held numerous grants for research in the former U.S.S.R. and Russia and has published on the social and cultural history of the Russian Revolution and early Soviet state building. 

Orlovsky’s major contributions have been the notion of a revolution of the lower middle strata in the society and politics of the Russian Empire and its successor regimes and the application of theories of corporatism to the institutional, social and political history of the turbulent years, 1914-1921.

He coordinated a project on the future of Soviet studies at the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies in Washington D.C. The results were published as Beyond Soviet Studies. His latest work, a history of the Russian Provisional Government of 1917, entitled Russia’s Democratic Revolution, is forthcoming.

 Boris Kolonitskii

Boris Kolonitskii

Boris Kolonitskii is Professor of the Study of the Russian Revolution at the European University at St. Petersburg and a Head Research Fellow at the St. Petersburg Institute of History of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Boris Kolonitskii is a leading expert on the cultural and political history of late imperial and revolutionary Russia, in which he has developed new approaches to tracing the shifts in popular and elite responses topolitical crisis, particularly as reflected in the media of popular and street culture—cartoons, magazines, posters, and rumors. His works on 1917 include many articles and books, including Interpreting the Russian Revolution: The Language and Symbols of 1917 (Yale University Press, 1999) and Tragicheskaya erotika: Obrazy imperatoskoi sem’i v gody Pervyi mirovoi voiny [Tragic Erotica: Images of the Royal Family During WWI] (Moscow, 2010).

‘East European Art History facing Post-Colonial Theory’

 Prof Piotr Piotrowski

Prof Piotr Piotrowski

Prof Piotr Piotrowski

The final keynote talk of the BASEES 2014 Annual Conference by Prof Piotr Piotrowski.

 

 

Professor Piotr Piotrowski is Professor ordinarius of Modern Art History at Adam Mickiewicz 
University, Poznan. He is interested in the social and political history of modern and 
contemporary art in Central and Eastern Europe, and has published In the Shadow of Yalta. 
Art and the Avant-garde in Eastern Europe, 1945-1989 (London, 2009) and Art and 
Democracy in Post-Communist Europe (London, 2012). 


Andrei Sannikov in conversation with Prof Stephen Hutchings

 Andrei Sannikov

Andrei Sannikov

Andrei Sannikov

2010 Belarus presidential candidate, Andrei Sannikov, talks with Prof Stephen Hutchings on day one of the BASEES 2014 Annual Confernce. 

 

 

Andrei Sannikov is a Belarusian politician and activist. He served as Deputy Foreign Minister of Belarus from 1995 until 1996, having previously headed the Belarusian delegation to the Nuclear and Conventional Weapons Armament Negotiations. He was one of the founders of Charter 97 in Belarus, and stood as a candidate in the Belarus presidential elections in 2010. In 2005 he was awarded the Bruno Kreisky Prize for accomplishments in human rights.

‘Would Pussy Riot Have Been Better Off in Guantanamo?’

 Prof Judith Pallot

Prof Judith Pallot

Professor Judith Pallot

From the first day of the BASEES 2014 Annual Conference, Prof Judith Pallot presents our first keynote. 

 

 

Professor Judith Pallot is Professor of the Human Geography of Russia at Oxford University. 
She has a long-standing interest in the Russian peasantry, publishing Land Reform in Russia, 
1906-1917: Peasant Responses to Stolypin's Project of Rural Transformation (Oxford, 1999), 
and is an authority on Russia’s penal geography, leading a major research project entitled 
‘Space and Gender in Russia's Geography of Punishment’. 


‘A Russian Downton Abbey? Telling Stories from the Eastern Front’

Prof Adele Lindenmeyr

Taken from the final day of the 2013 BASEES Annual Conference, Professor Adele Lindenmeyr from Villianova University USA presents: ‘A Russian Downton Abbey? Telling Stories from the Eastern Front’

Professor Adele Lindenmeyr is Professor of History and Dean of Graduate Studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Villanova University, Pennsylvania, USA. Her books include Poverty is Not a Vice: Charity, Society and the State in Imperial Russia (1996), which was awarded the Heldt Prize for the best book published by a woman in Slavic Studies. Professor Lindenmeyr was honoured with the Outstanding Achievement Award by the Association for Women in Slavic Studies in 2003. 

Prof Adele Lindenmeyr


Luke Harding in conversation with Stephen White

 

Presented on the second day of the BASEES annual conference, Luke Harding from the Guardian in discussion with Prof Stephen White (University of Glasgow).

Luke Harding is an award-winning foreign correspondent with The Guardian. He has reported from Delhi, Berlin and Moscow and has covered wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya. His book Mafia State: How one reporter became an enemy of the brutal new Russia, was published by Guardian Books in 2011. He is currently based at The Guardian's office in London. 

 

 

 

 

 

 Luke Harding

Luke Harding

 Professor Stephen White

Professor Stephen White


‘Religious Organisation and the Legacy of Communism in East-Central Europe’

 

Prof Sabrina Ramet

 

 Prof Sabrina Ramet

Prof Sabrina Ramet

The first of two talks from the second day of the BASEES annual conference, Professor Sabrina Remet presents ‘Religious Organisation and the Legacy of Communism in East-Central Europe’.
 

Professor Sabrina P. Ramet is Professor of Political Science at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. Her expertise lies in the area of central and east European politics and culture and she has published The Three Yugoslavias:  State-building and Legitimation, 1918—2004 (2006) and Civic and Uncivic Values in Macedonia (2013). Professor Ramet is a member of the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences & Letters. 


Towards a Greater Europe: Problems and Paradoxes

Prof Richard Sakwa

Prof Richard Sakwa

Taken from our annual BASEES conference, Professor Richard Sakwa presents his talk 'Towards a Greater Europe: Problems and Paradoxes'

Professor Richard Sakwa is Professor of Russian and East European Politics at the University of Kent. A leading expert on the politics of contemporary Russia, his books include The Crisis of Russian Democracy: The Dual State, Factionalism and the Medvedev Succession (2011), The Quality of Freedom: Khodorkovsky, Putin, and the Yukos Affair (2009) and Russian Politics and Society (4th edn., 2008). Professor Sakwa is a member of the Academy of Social Sciences.