BASEES 2018

“Fifty years On”: Remembering and Forgetting the post-war revolutions in Eastern Europe

Keynote Roundtable  

Saturday, 14 April, 17:30-19:00 – Auditorium

Chair: Libora Oates-Indruchová (University of Graz, Austria)
Speakers:           
Janos Rainer
 (Head of the Institute for the History of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution)
Jacques Rupnik (CERI, Sciences Po)
Jan Kubik (SSEES, London)

Fifty years ago there were exciting events taking place in Czechoslovakia; Aleksander Dubček had become first secretary of the KSČ and political liberalisation was under way. But it was not to last long. On August 20th Soviet troops entered the country and put an end to the Prague Spring. This was neither the first nor last revolution to challenge the communist hegemony in the countries of East Central Europe.  In this keynote panel, we will be asking our speakers to remind us of these oppositional uprisings and the people involved in them, and to reflect upon how they are being re-interpreted at the present in the service of leaderships in the communist successor states.  Our speakers are Jacques Rupnik who was a student at the time of the Soviet invasion and having left Czechoslovakia her returned in 1990-2 as an adviser to president an adviser to Vaslav Havel,  Janos Reiner,  Director of the Institute for the History of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, Budapest and Jan Kubik, former Director of SSEES who will be speaking respectively about how the revolutions of the post WWII revolutions or uprisings are being commemorated (or not) in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland.

Libora Oates-Indruchová

Libora Oates-Indruchová

Libora Oates-Indruchová is Professor of Sociology of Gender at the University of Graz (A). Her research interests include cultural representations of gender, gender and social change, censorship, and narrative research, with a focus on state-socialist and post state-socialist Czech Republic. Her recent articles include “A Dulled Mind in an Active Body: Growing Up as a Girl in Normalization Czechoslovakia” (in Childhood and Schooling in (Post)Socialist Societies: Memories of Everyday Life, ed. by Iveta Silova, Nelli Piattoeva, and Zsuzsa Millei, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) and Unraveling a Tradition, or Spinning a Myth?: Gender Critique in Czech Society and Culture“ (Slavic Review, Winter 2016). She co-edited The Politics of Gender Culture under State Socialism: an Expropriated Voice (with Hana Havelková; Routledge 2014, paperback 2015; expanded Czech edition 2015) that won the 2016 BASEES Women’s Forum Book Prize. She is currently completing a book manuscript on Czech and Hungarian post-1968 scholarly publishing and censorship.

János M. Rainer

János M. Rainer

János M. Rainer (1957), Hungarian historian, professor of contemporary history at Eszterházy Károly University (Eger, Hungary), head of the 1956 Institute – Oral History Archive Department at the Hungarian National Széchényi Library (Budapest). Before 1989 he published in samizdat on the reprisals after 1956. His field of expertise is Hungarian history after WWII, focusing on the 1956 revolution and the Kádár-period. His two-volume biography on Imre Nagy was published in enshortened version in Polish, Russian, German and English.

Jacques Rupnik

Jacques Rupnik

Jacques Rupnik is Director of Research at the Centre de Recherches Internationale (CERI) at Sciences Po, France, where he also serves as Professor of Political Science. He was educated at the University of Paris and at Harvard, is currently Director of Research at CERI and Professor at Sciences Po in Paris as well as visiting professor at the College of Europe in Bruges and Charles University in Prague. Since he joined CERI, Sciences Po in 1982 he has been writing and lecturing about East and Central European history and politics and European integration. He was advisor to president Vaclav Havel in the 1990’s. Executive director of the International Commission for the Balkans, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (1995-1996) and drafter of its report Unfinished Peace (1996), member of the Independent International Commission on Kosovo (1999-2000) and co-drafter of The Kosovo Report (Oxford UP, 2000). Among the various positions held: advisor to the European Commission (2007 – 2010). Member of the board of the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation in The Hague since 2010. Member of the board of directors of the European Partnership for Democracy in Brussels (2008-2013). He has been a visiting Professor in several European universities and in the Department of Government, at Harvard University where he is regularly Visiting Scholar at the Center for European Studies.

J.Rupnik has published a number of books and scholarly articles including Histoire du Parti Communiste Tchécoslovaque (1981) The Other Europe (1989), Le Printemps tchécoslovaque 1968 (1999), 1989 as a Political World Event: Democracy, Europe and the new international system, London, Routledge, ( 2013, with an introduction by V.Havel), Géopolitique de la démocratization, l’Europe et ses voisinages, Presses de Sciences Po  (2014).

Jan Kubik

Jan Kubik

Jan Kubik is Professor at the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies and the Department of Political Science, Rutgers University in New Brunswick. His earlier publications include: The Power of Symbols against the Symbols of Power. The Rise of Solidarity and the Fall of State Socialism in Poland and Rebellious Civil Society: Popular Protest and Democratic Consolidation in Poland, 1989-1993 (with Grzegorz Ekiert). His recent work deals with the relationship between political science and cultural anthropology (Anthropology and Political Science: a convergent approach, with Myron Aronoff); critical analysis of post-communist studies (Postcommunism from Within. Social Justice, Mobilization, and Hegemony, edited with Amy Linch); and the politics of memory (Twenty Years After Communism: The Politics of Memory and Commemoration, prepared and edited with Michael Bernhard). Among his research interests are: culture and politics; civil society, protest politics and social movements; communist and post-communist politics; the rise of populism; and interpretive and ethnographic methods in political science. He received M.A. (sociology and philosophy) from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland and Ph.D. (anthropology, with distinction) from Columbia University.

Human Rights in the Region: Domestic and International Perspectives

Keynote Roundtable  

Friday, 13 April, Auditorium 12:30-13:30

Chair: Judith Pallot (BASEES President)
Speakers :
Mary McAuley
 (Independent Scholar)
Sergey Golubok (St. Petersburg Bar Association)
Heather McGill (Amnesty International)
Dalia Leinarte (UN Committee on the Elimination of    Discrimination against Women, UN [CEDAW])

By the time delegates will have convened for this year’s annual conference, Russians will have just voted in their seventh President. The election will have taken place against a backdrop of concerns about just how free and fair the electoral process is in Russia and whether the movement towards greater democratisation in the country is stalled. No less than in Russia events in East Central Europe during the last decade have raised similar concerns, which are particularly poignant given that 2018 is the fiftieth anniversary of the Prague Spring and its suppression by Soviet armed forces.  Our guest speakers in the opening keynote session, are all involved in different ways in promoting human rights in Russia and across the BASEES region either through their practical work or scholarship.  The session will begin with Mary McAuley, who interviewed the leading human rights activists for her recent book “Human Rights in Russia: Citizens and the State from Perestroika to Putin” to introduce the topic discussing the changing face of human rights activism from the end of the Soviet period to present day. She will be followed by our three other speakers, all of whom are involved in different ways in defending human rights; human rights lawyer Sergey Golubok, who represents parties in cases heard before the Russian courts, including the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court, and before courts in Belarus and the European Court of Human Rights; Heather McGill, from Amnesty International who has been in charge of research on Belarus, Ukraine and the author of a recently published report of prisoners transportation in the Russian federation, and Dalia Leinarte, Professor of History at the University of Vilnius and currently chairperson of the UN The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) whose brief is to advance gender equality and human rights for women and girls around the world.

Mary McAuley

Mary McAuley

Mary McAuley (M.A., D. Phil. Oxon) left an academic career, as Fellow in Politics at St Hilda’s College, Oxford, in 1995 to head the Ford Foundation’s Moscow office, with particular responsibility for supporting human rights and legal reform.  In May 2002 she returned to London, where, as an Associate of the International Centre for Prison Studies (then at King’s College, London) she wrote on juvenile justice. Publications include: Russia’s Politics of Uncertainty, Cambridge University Press, 1997; Deti v tiurme , OGI, Moscow, 2008; Children in Custody: Anglo-Russian Perspectives, Bloomsbury Academic, 2010; Human Rights in Russia: Citizens and the State from Perestroika to Putin, I B Tauris, April 2015

ergei Golubok

ergei Golubok

Sergei Golubok (LL.M. in International Human Rights Law (University of Essex, United Kingdom), Ph.D. in International Law and European Law (St Petersburg State University, Russia) has work experience with Registry of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg (2008-2011). Since 2011 he is a practicing attorney in Russia, member of the St Petersburg Bar Association, mostly representing applicants before the European Court of Human Rights and the Constitutional Court of Russia, and conducting criminal defense. In 2017 Dr Golubok was elected by his colleagues to serve as a Board member of his Bar Association. He is also member of the European Criminal Bar Association and associate member of the International Criminal Court Bar Association. In 2017 Sergei was awarded a prize for human rights litigation by the Moscow Helsinki Group. Available on Facebook: Sergey Golubok and on Instragram: goluboksergey.

Heather McGill

Heather McGill

Heather McGill graduated with an M.A. in Political Science from McGill University. Since 1990 she has worked in various roles with Amnesty International. Her first job was as USSR Field Officer, training and assisting Amnesty International activists in the former Soviet Union and then as researcher covering the Western CIS, Russia and since 2017 Central Asia. She has researched and published reports on the death penalty in Belarus, violence against women in Belarus and Ukraine, the investigation of torture allegations in Ukraine and Moldova and most recently a report on Prisoner Transportation in Russia. She is currently researching the issue of legal capacity and mental disability in Kazakhstan. 

Dalia Leinarte

Dalia Leinarte

Dalia Leinarte is Professor of History and Chairperson of the UN CEDAW Committee. Leinarte writes extensively on women and family in Imperial Russia, and former Soviet Union. She is an author of The Lithuanian Family in its European Context, 1800-1914: Marriage, Divorce and Flexible Communities (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) and Adopting and Remembering Soviet Reality: Life Stories of Lithuanian Women, 1945–1970 (Brill, 2010). Dalia Leinarte has received national and international recognition. In her country she is a recognized gender equality expert and defender of women’s rights. An especially strong example of the recognition of her work is that in 2012 the Lithuanian government nominated her as a candidate for the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, UN (CEDAW). She was successfully elected.